Archive for the ‘Streets and Trees’ category

Crosswalk Improvements Coming to Irving by Hospital Center

April 17, 2017

After a lot of advocacy, it looks like a controlled crosswalk is finally being installed at Irving and Hobart streets to permit pedestrians to safely cross to the Washington Hospital Center. I know that a lot of people let DDOT know that this was a priority during the Crosstown Multimodal Study workshops. Below are a few photos showing progress so far.

DDOT Repairs Sidewalk on Park Place North of Newton

March 24, 2017

I’m happy to report that the wonky section of sidewalk on Park Place just north of Newton was repaired yesterday. The issue with this section of sidewalk was a severe slope down to the curb that was created when the sidewalk was replaced in June 2016. After much patience and perseverance on my part — and engagement by neighbors on this block (thank you team!) —  DDOT came out, reinspected the section, and came up with a better solution to address the ADA and safety issues related to this stretch of sidewalk.

As you can see below, this has all paid off with a far safer sidewalk for all.

ANC1A Votes to Oppose DC Council’s Small Business Parking Bill

March 13, 2017

Enhanced parking sign limiting parking to area residents only.

On March 8, 2017, the Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) that represents Park View and northern Columbia Heights voted unanimously to oppose Council Bill 22-0125 that would expand access to the residential parking permit program (RPP) for small businesses having 10 employees or fewer that abut residential RPP blocks. Small business would pay the same annual $35 per pass rate that residents currently pay. The bill was introduced by Councilmembers Robert White (at-large), Brianne Nadeau (Ward 1), and Brandon Todd (Ward 4) on February 21, 2017. The bill had no co-sponsors and has been referred to the Committee on Transportation and the Environment.

The resolution passed by ANC1A identified the following areas that the legislation does not address:

  • the high demand for parking on public residential streets that currently exists in Ward 1;
  • how small business parking permits would be managed within the context of Ward 1’s enhanced RPP program; and,
  • if small businesses would be permitted to participate in the RPP program if they are located in new buildings where residents have been denied participating in the RPP program through restrictive covenants.

More broadly, the bill raises questions of equity and fairness. Currently, large developments that are unable to provide off-street parking are restricting their future residents from participating in the RPP program, suggesting that local streets are already at capacity with no space remaining for new residents. If participation in the RPP program is extended to out-of-District employees of business, does this set a precedent to other out-of-District employees such as teachers, police officers, firemen, etc.. Lastly, there is not indication that there any consideration was given for limited use of metered parking space on commercial corridors for employees. In any case, there certainly was no outreach from the Council to ANC1A prior to the introduction of the bill.

ANC1A will continue to be engaged on this issue as it is reviewed by the Council. On Wednesday, the ANC voted to oppose the Small Business Parking Permit Act of 2017 as it found the bill as introduced to be lacking an equitable balance for both businesses and residents. The approved ANC resolution identified a number of areas of concern, some being that it:

  • promotes a greater overall reliance on automobiles;
  • offers no rational for extending parking benefits to non-District residents;
  • does not audit the current availability of on-street parking or require DDOT to perform a transportation impact study on a neighborhood-by-neighborhood basis throughout the District of Columbia; and,
  • does not take into account the deeply subsidized fee currently extended to District residents when setting the fee for small business parking.

The full resolution is below:

DDOT to Address ADA Issues with Park Place Sidewalk

March 3, 2017

img_1157***UPDATE – March 5***

Signs went up on Friday, March 3rd, showing that work may begin on fixing the section of sidewalk on Park Place between Otis and Princeton as early as March 6th and is expected to be completed by March 18, 2017. Minor delays may occur due to weather. As mentioned below, the project not only will level out the sidewalk in this area, but will also raise the curb. In speaking to DDOT, they do not anticipate that this will create any problem with doors opening from parked cars once completed.

[Original Post – March 3]

Section of sidewalk on Park Place just north of Otis Place.

Section of sidewalk on Park Place just north of Otis Place.

After sustained efforts by residents and me, DDOT has determined that they will rebuild the section of sidewalk on Park Place just north of Otis Place. This sidewalk section was originally replaced back in June 2016 — not once, but twice. The first time it was poured the sidewalk was too low compared to the steps leading up to the houses, so it was raised creating a severe slop closer to the street so that the sidewalk could connect with the curb. It was quickly pointed out to DDOT that this created a safety hazard, yet they responded that they had to do this to make the sidewalk ADA compliant.

Yet, with sustained advocacy, DDOT’s ADA person finally visited the site and agreed that while the sidewalk was now ADA compliant the way it sloped to meet the curb was not. So, DDOT has decided to raise the curb to align with the existing compliant sidewalk.

While I have not yet received notification on when the work will start, it has been marked up to show what section needs to be rebuilt.

Another Neighborhood Alley Getting Rebuilt

February 22, 2017

Another local alley is in the process of getting rebuilt. This time, the alley is on the block surrounded by Princeton, Park Place, Otis, and Warder. I’ve been asked by a few neighbors as to why this alley is being constructed strictly of concrete. The short answer is that DDOT has a policy of replacing alleys in kind — meaning that if the alley was originally constructed as a brick alley, the new alley will be brick. If the alley was originally a concrete alley, then the new alley will be concrete.

While alleys in Park View were replaced in both the Fenty and Gray administrations, the reconstruction/replacement rate has increased significantly due to Mayor Bowser’s focus on the issue.

Below are two photos of the work in progress.

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Pedestrian Scramble Coming to 14th and Irving Streets

February 17, 2017

scrambleYesterday, I received a notice by DDOT of their intent to install a pedestrian scramble at the intersection of 14th and Irving streets. This was one of the recommendations to come out of last year’s Crosstown Multimodal Study.

According to the notice (NOI 17-37 TOA), “the intersection of 14th and Irving streets, NW is controlled by a traffic signal. The Crosstown Multimodal Transportation Study conducted in 2016 recommended installation of an all-red phase to reduce the conflicts between pedestrian and vehicular traffic navigation through the intersection. Following the planning study recommendations, DDOT conducted further traffic analysis and subsequently completed the intersection design to implement the recommended all-red phase. The all-red phase, also known as “Pedestrian Scramble” will be implement along with diagonal crosswalks and “No Turn on Red” restriction. New traffic signals, curb ramps and signage will be installed at this intersection to complement the Pedestrian Scramble.”

Comments on this matter must be filed in writing to DDOT no later than 30 days after February 16th.

DDOT Releases New Mobility Website to Track Traffic Congestion

February 15, 2017

district-mobility

In exploring DDOT’s new District Mobility Website (full press release below), there is some interesting data on population (broken down by education, race, and income), the District’s transportation network, the modes of transportation that are used, and which routes are the most traveled and which bus routes & stops are the most used. It is an interesting site that provides a good overview of traffic in D.C.

Full DDOT News Release from February 13th below:

(Washington, DC) – The District Department of Transportation (DDOT) today announced the release of the District Mobility website as part of an effort to clearly communicate how the District’s transportation system is performing.

District Mobility is a dynamic web tool that shows the District’s state of mobility for surface transportation modes and outlines DDOT’s recommendations for managing and operating built infrastructure to meet growing demand.

“The goal of the District Mobility Project is to better quantify and qualify the state of the District’s transportation system performance from a holistic, multimodal perspective,” said DDOT Director Leif Dormsjo. “The interactive, data-rich design of District Mobility provides an innovative platform for sharing the state of mobility and DDOT’s progress towards reducing congestion on our roads.”

District Mobility is part of the ongoing District Mobility Project. The Project was established to increase understanding of mobility issues in the District and define a program of improvements to address them. It builds on national advances in transportation system performance management to track District-wide trends in congestion and travel-time reliability, among other key system performance metrics.

The District Mobility Project leverages transportation data for multiple modes (walking, bicycling, transit, and driving) to inform DDOT’s short- and long-term investment strategies. The metrics, data, and recommendations developed through the District Mobility Project are presented in both the District Mobility website and a District Mobility Report.

“The District has a diverse, multimodal transportation network that serves District residents, regional commuters, and tourists from around the world,” said Project Manager Stephanie Dock. “District Mobility is arranged into a series of stories describing the people who travel in DC, the transportation modes that they use to move around, and how they experience different aspects of congestion and mobility. Interactive maps allow website users to see how transportation demand in the District changes over the course of a day and how those changes impact all modes.”

By highlighting areas with high congestion, low reliability, and poor accessibility, District Mobility shows where DDOT will target near-term investments to improve multimodal mobility.

The District Mobility website and the District Mobility Report are both available at DistrictMobility.org. Feedback is welcome. Contact information is available on the website.


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