Posted tagged ‘historic preservation’

Historic Preservation Review Board Approves Restoration Plans for Hebrew Home on Spring Road

January 26, 2018

At the January 25, 2018, Historic Preservation Review Board hearing, the Board approved the preservation plan for the renovation of the historic Hebrew Home building at 1125 Spring Road. The case was approved as part of the Board’s consent agenda. The hearing only focused on the overall plan for the historic structure, and not the proposed development east of the property as it does not encroach upon the historic site.

Site plan showing location of non-historic structures to be removed during renovations.

The renovation plan focused on exterior modifications. The primary exterior modifications include complete replacement of existing (non-historic) windows and doors. Aluminum-clad wood windows with simulated divided lights are proposed. The development team consulted historic photographs in order to propose new windows that match the original windows as closely as possible with respect to operation and lite patterns.

Restoration of the existing exterior masonry is also planned as part of the renovation. This will include cleaning and repair/repointing of the brick as necessary. As part of the renovation, a limited number of selective reductions of non-historic exterior elements is proposed including removal of a one-story brick shed on the west side, a one-story open carport structure on the north side, an existing two-story free-standing utility building on the north side and a one-story walkway canopy connecting to the existing adjacent Robeson School building to the east.
Two small additions were also proposed and approved. A one-story addition on the first floor within the existing interior courtyard (and not visible from the exterior) which will provide a multi-use amenity space for residents and a one-story addition on the fifth floor which will provide 2 apartments and a second means of egress from an existing amenity space overlooking Spring Road. This proposed roof addition is located on the east wing adjacent to the interior courtyard and is set back substantially from the east building face to minimize (or eliminate) its visual perception from the public right-of-way.

The existing open space along Spring Road between the Hebrew Home and the adjacent Jewish Social Services Agency building will be redeveloped to create a new pocket park accessible to the public. In keeping with the original character of this exterior space, the design will provide small passive-use spaces with minimal plantings. In order to provide access to the space from the Spring Road streetscape, a new ADA ramp and access stair will be constructed in public space. This will require minor modifications to the existing brick retaining wall at the back of the existing sidewalk.

Below are some renderings filed with the HPRB case.

(Plan showing park area with notations showing improvements.)

(Plan showing location of new additions.)

(Perspective from the southeast (front), identifying location of rooftop addition.)

(Perspective from northwest (rear), identifying location of rooftop addition.)

Park View Field House Honored in Annual Preservation Awards

June 2, 2017

Recipients of the 2017 HPRB Chair Award. Photo by D.C. Preservation League/Jason Hornick Photography

At this year’s District of Columbia Awards for Excellence in Historic Preservation, the renovation of the Park View Playground Field House won the Historic Preservation Review Board Chair Award — once of eleven awards recognized this year. The award was presented to ANC1A Chair Kent Boese, the Department of Parks and Recreation, and KADCON Corporation. The District of Columbia Office of Planning and Historic Preservation Office, in partnership with the DC Preservation League and the Daughters of the American Revolution, presented the 14th annual District of Columbia Awards for Excellence in Historic Preservation on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 in the historic DAR Constitution Hall.

Since 2003, the District government has honored over 225 outstanding projects, programs and individuals for exemplary work and commitment to historic preservation in Washington, DC. This year’s awards recognize 47 individuals, businesses, government agencies and local organizations.

Below is the short video that accompanied the award presentation ceremony.

 

Preservation Office’s New Online Application Maps Historic Development and Preservation of DC

November 29, 2016

I thought this was interesting, yesterday the Historic Preservation Office announced the launch of HistoryQuest DC, a GIS-based web map that provides historical data on approximately 127,000 extant buildings in Washington, D.C. The Office of Planning’s Web site provides the following description of the application:

The application, HistoryQuest DC, is an interactive GIS map that provides historical data on approximately 127,000 extant buildings in Washington, D.C.  The map offers several operational layers of information for the user including historic data on individual buildings, links to documentation on properties listed in the National Register of Historic Places, information on historic residential subdivisions, and the identification and boundaries of the L’Enfant Plan, and the city’s Squares, and Wards. The featured layer in the map—the Historical Data on DC Buildings—provides information from a variety of sources on original dates of construction, architects, owners and builders of the city’s historic buildings.

The application also includes a Query tool that allows the user to analyze the historic data within a specified geographic area or city-wide.

This application has evolved out of the DC Historical Building Permits Database project and is still a work-in-progress. Anyone with additional information or knowledge about specific buildings that will enhance, enrich, or correct the map, please use the “Propose Data Change” on the banner at the top of the map, complete and submit the GeoForm.

By using the search box, anyone using the maps can quickly get to basic data on any property, including when a house was built and who the architect and builder were. The various layers also can generate some interesting maps. In addition to historic landmarks, the following maps show some examples of the maps that it generates.

history-quest-1(In looking at the map generally, it is easy to quickly get an idea of how old section of DC are. The older the building, the darker the color.)

history-quest-2(In exploring the various layers, one option is to show existing historic districts.)

history-quest-3(Another interesting feature, many of the original subdivisions have been recorded.)

Inaugural Evelyn Greenberg Preservation Awards Includes Recognition of Historic Hebrew Home Building

August 4, 2016

On June 9, 2016, the Jewish Historical Society of Greater Washington (JHSGW) presented their inaugural Evelyn Greenberg Preservation Awards — a tribute for Evelyn Greenberg, who was instrumental in re-discovering and saving the historic 1876 Adas Israel synagogue from the wrecker’s ball in 1969. The building is destined to be moved again as a result of the Capitol Crossing project.

Two Greenberg Preservation Awards were presented this year. I received one for my work that resulted in the successful nomination of the buildings at 1125-1131 Spring Road, NW — the former home of the Hebrew Home of the Aged and the JSSA (Jewish Social Service Agency). Both properties are now on the D.C. Inventory of Historic Sites and listed on the National Register.

I thought you would enjoy watching the video of the event, and my presentation on the history of the Hebrew Home, which was released yesterday by the JHSGW and view-able below.

Check Out the Ward 1 Heritage Guide, Great Overview of Ward 1 History and Neighborhoods

July 20, 2016

The Historic Preservation Office (HPO) finally has the Ward 1 Heritage Guide available on their Website (click on image below). It’s an interesting overview of Ward 1 history, culture, and neighborhoods. HPO’s Ward Heritage Guides and a fun introduction to what makes each Ward/neighborhood special. While I’ve posted it before, you can also check out the Ward 4 guide here.

Ward 1 Heritage Guide

DC Preservation League Launches DC Historic Sites App

May 20, 2016

Earlier this week the DC Preservation League launched a new app that I think it pretty cool. It is called DC Historic Sites and it allows users to quickly get an idea of the historic properties that are located within their community. In addition to providing a map and allowing users to locate recognized historic properties throughout the city, it also includes pictures and text so that you can learn more about the sites.

According to the DC Preservation League’s announcement, the app is still a work in progress. Most notably, not all of DC’s historic landmarks have been included within the database yet. I’ve begun sending in text and photos of landmarks that I know aren’t on the map yet to assist with building it out and expect them to be added shortly.

Even in its current state, the app is really interesting and should be a great way for everyone to learn more about the architectural and cultural history of Washington.

To learn more about D.C.’s historic places and spaces, visit the DC Historic Sites site and download the app.

DC Historic Sites app(Screen shot of DC Historic Sites app showing Park View School listing.)

Reminder: Preservation Program & Discussion Tonight at School

September 24, 2015

Tonight there is a community meeting on the topic of historic preservation and historic districts. The program will begin with a presentation by Kim Williams of the D.C. Historic Preservation Office. She will also be available to answer questions from the community afterward. The event is intended to support a community dialogue on the issues of preservation, neighborhood character, and development as they relate to our changing neighborhood and growing city.

Historic preservation is one way that some D.C. neighborhoods have chosen to maintain neighborhood character.  There are currently 55 historic districts and almost 27,000 structures designated and listed in the District of Columbia Inventory of Historic Sites. There are 584 D.C. historic sites and districts listed on the National Register of Historic Place.

If you plan to attend, below are the details:

Where: Bruce-Monroe @ Park View School Auditorium (3560 Warder Street)
When: 7 p.m.
Date: September 24, 2015

North Elevation Park View School 1915(North Elevation, Park View School, 1915)


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