Posted tagged ‘Art’

Interactive Art Installation Explores Human Behavior on City Streets

January 24, 2017

The Walkway(The Walkway, and interactive art installation at the Reeves Center)

There is currently a public art exhibit on the corner of 14th and U streets in front of the Reeves Center. It is titled The Walkway and it is an interactive installation that is an exploration of human behavior towards others on city streets and in public spaces. The art space consists of a tunnel with each side showing faces and statements of interactions that have been experienced in public. Some of the experiences shared are positive — others are negative, harassing, or hostile.

What I like about the experience is that it makes one reflect upon their own experiences and interactions in public spaces. There is also an online component which allows anyone to participate in the project, which is a collaboration between the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities and the District Department of Transportation. Through the portal, they are collecting information regarding words, phrases and gestures that are used in public spaces to address others. This is a study to explore what people consider to be respectful, friendly, non-friendly or threatening interactions. While data collected will be used as part of an interactive exhibit, responses will be kept anonymous.

Below are a few more photos from my visit:

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Call For Artists to Participate in Historical Society of Washington’s 2017 For the Record Exhibition

January 12, 2017

For all the artists in our community, here is an opportunity to showcase your work and our greater community!

FINAL ENTRY DEADLINE: EXTENDED ***May 15, 2017***

The Historical Society of Washington, D.C. invites all artists residing in the Washington metropolitan area to enter its 2017 For the Record juried exhibition and fundraiser. All art work meeting exhibition guidelines will be considered.

OVERVIEW

Visitors enjoying themselves at the opening of For the Record exhibition in 2016.

Visitors enjoying themselves at the opening of For the Record exhibition in 2016.

The Historical Society of Washington, D.C challenges local artists to create 2D artwork depicting a specific neighborhood in each of the city’s eight wards. Drawing upon For the Record’s successful 2015 and 2016 iterations, the Historical Society seeks to engage an even wider community of artists in this exciting exhibition and program. For the Record provides exposure, recognition, and enduring prestige to local artists, and raises funds to support the Historical Society. The 2017 program and exhibition will document and feature:

Ward 1: Howard Town/Pleasant Plains
Ward 2: Burleith
Ward 3: Palisades
Ward 4: Shepherd Park
Ward 5: Ivy City
Ward 6: Buzzard Point
Ward 7: Kenilworth
Ward 8: Congress Heights

For the Record is an opportunity for people who live, work, and play in D.C. to capture and share the built environment and social fabric of these neighborhoods, and to portray Washington as it exists today.

Curators from local institutions will serve as jurors for the competition and chose the artworks that will comprise the exhibit. The selected works will be displayed in summer 2017. Up to five works may be chosen by the Collections Committee to become part of the Historical Society’s permanent collection. Cash prizes will be given to the top 3 photographs and top 3 non-photographs; an additional prize will be given to the work deemed Best Overall. New this year, the Best in Ward prize will be given to the artist whose work is chosen as the best piece representing each specific ward.

Award recipients and artwork chosen for the permanent collection will be announced during the reception. (more…)

See/Change Video Installation Closes

November 22, 2016

The See/Change video installation along Georgia Avenue came to a close along with the end of FotoWeekDC. Yet, in the week residents and visitors of Georgia Avenue were able to enjoy it, it brightened our lives and highlighted the diversity, faces, and stories of the community. It also received some notable press taking our community to a much broader audience than just the stretch of road between Florida Avenue and New Hampshire Avenue — such as the article Encouraging Neighbors to See Eye to Eye written by Jessica Leigh Hester in CityLab.

Below is a short video that gives an idea of what viewing the installation was like. The full video is much longer than this clip. It is my hope that we can find a permanent location for the installation within the community.

New Temporary Video Art Now on Georgia Avenue

November 14, 2016

img_1832-2Saturday kicked off a week-long video installation on Georgia Avenue by local artist Philippa Hughes. The project is called SEE/CHANGE which is composed of video portraits of residents and business owners who live and work along Lower Georgia Avenue. The video will be projected from within vacant and other spaces and on the sides of buildings along the corridor each night. According to Philippa Hughes, “commuters and pedestrians will see that they are passing through a thriving and diverse community. Video stories told by residents about their neighborhood will be posted online at seechangedc.com.”

In addition to the video, there will be A community discussion: “What are the changes you see?” tonight from 6:30 to 8 pm at Walls of Books (3325 Georgia); an art workshop called “Welcome to Washington” on Satruday, November 19th; and a Closing party also on the 19th at Midlands (3333 Georgia) beginning at 5:30 pm.

This project is part of a creative placemaking project supported by the DC Office of Planning.

img_1831(Philippa Hughes at the SEE/CHANGE kickoff at Tchoup (3301 Georgia Avenue))

The map below shows the locations of where the videos will be located.

Local Artists Shown at Bloombars

November 3, 2016

I know we have a lot of art lovers in the community, so I wanted to make sure people now about a show opening at Bloombars on Saturday, Nov. 5th. The flyer is below, and several of the artists are local to the community. It should be a nice way to spend an evening.

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Interesting New Video Art From K Street

September 29, 2016

This week I noticed some interesting new video art/displays on the redevelopment of 1800 K Street, NW. The screens wrap around the exterior of the building between the first and second floor, and are occasionally interrupted by digital signs for the businesses located in the building. The displays show people walking and running, with a background that changes colors and themes. I’ve seen the background be black, purple, and blue as well as have bubbles and hoops.

It got me thinking that we should be seeking creative, artistic ideas like this incorporated into some of the development that will occur on Georgia Avenue. Below are two short videos I took at 1800 K Street that provide and idea of what the video is like.

1921 Painting with Local Connection

September 16, 2016

A while ago I found a painting of the cherry trees at the tidal basin which caught my eye. It isn’t much, and originally I thought it was a colored photograph, but upon closer examination I realized that it was actually a painting that included the signature E.B. Chappell, 1921. Doing a quick search for the name, I came up empty and set it aside as a project for another day. You can see a photograph of the painting below.

chappell-painting(Painting by Edwin B. Chappell, 1921.)

Last weekend I took up the project again and this time I found a reference that identified the artist.

According to an obituary in the Washington Post, the artist was Edwin B. Chappell. Chappell was born in England ca.  1851 and in his youth immigrated to America, settling in Bedford, Pennsylvania. He moved to Washington, D.C. in 1918 and lived in the Petworth neighborhood at 4020 Third Street, NW, from 1919 until his death in 1925. He was known for painting pictures of the Japanese cherry blossoms in Potomac Park.

Sadly his latter years were not without pain and suffering, as sixteen years prior to his death he injured his back in an accident when he fell from a scaffold. About a year prior to his death, Chappell fell from a ladder and broke his arm, and in the summer of 1924 he was struck by an automobile which left him crippled and despondent.


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