Posted tagged ‘DDOT’

Update on the Irving/Kenyon Crosstown Protect Bike Lane Project

May 4, 2020

Milling and paving work on Kenyon Street, looking west from Irving Street intersection.

For people who may not be out and about due to the COVID-19 pandemic and Stay-at-Home Order currently in place, you may not be aware of the progress that DDOT is making on the Crosstown Protected Bike Lane project that will connect Brookland and Park View along Irving Street to the north of the Washington Hospital Center.

Those who live near Wangari Gardens or have traveled past the hospitals recently will have noticed that Irving and Kenyon streets east of Park Place have seen a lot of activity with crews milling and paving the streets. This work was in preparation for the crosstown protected bike lanes and appears to be nearly completed.

Due to this progress, DDOT reports that the project to construct the protected bike lanes is on schedule to begin this week. The section where implementation will occur is from Michigan Avenue on the east to Warder Street on the west.

Click here to see the plans from DDOT for the Irving and Kenyon street protected bike lane.

I am also including images below on the Kenyon Street sections as they are the areas neighbors in Park View will be most interested in.

(Paving work on Irving Street)

Changes Coming to the 3500 b/o New Hampshire Avenue this Spring/Summer

January 31, 2020

DDOT is planing to implement some changes to the section of New Hampshire Avenue between Rock Creek Church/Otis Place on the north and Park Road on the south. As the majority of the work will be bollards and stripping, these changes won’t be implemented until the weather gets warmer … meaning that implementation is targeted for Spring/Summer of 2020.

The plans below reflect what DDOT intends to implement and shows locations of bollards, stripping, and new signage that will installed in the area.

DDOT Hosting Ward 1 Transportation Meeting on Saturday!

November 13, 2019

DDOT is hosting a public event to let residents engage directly with the agency to learn more about its projects in Ward 1. Relevant information is listed below

Who: Ward 1 residents and The District Department of Transportation (DDOT)
What: DDOT’s Ward 1 Open House
When: Saturday, November 16, 2019 from 12:00PM-2:00PM
Where: Columbia Heights Community Center (1480 Girard Street NW)
Why: To educate, engage and inform residents of what’s happening in the community

Residents may be particularly interested in the 14th Street Bus information that was discussed at ANC Transportation Committee meetings.

Do You Support Adding Street Trees to the 800 Block of Princeton Place, NW?

September 30, 2019

As anyone who has lived in Park View for a while knows, we have a lot of hot, treeless streets due to a lack of planning when the neighborhood was originally building out. I have had numerous conversations over the years with neighbors who would like to see more trees, and have worked to get more spaces for street trees where ever I find an opportunity.

While out walking last week, it dawned on me that an ideal place to add more trees could be the 800 block of Princeton Place, NW. While it is a short street with only two rowhouses on it, I think every treebox we can create improves the entire neighborhood.

The 800 block of Princeton Place has conditions favorable for adding trees in public space.

What makes the 800 block of Princeton Place promising for adding tree box bump outs is its width and configuration. Currently, it is designated as a one-way street (east bound). It also currently does not allow parking on either the north or south side of the street (although I have seen people park on the south side on more than one occasion). The street is also just over 35 feet wide, meaning that is is over built for the two lanes of traffic it allows.

Measurment in ArcGIS indicates that Princeton Place is 35 feet wide, more than enough for two lanes of traffic and tree box bump outs.

An onsite visit to the street along with reviewing maps indicates that there may be utility infrastructure on the south side of the street, so that leaves the north side open to potential reconfiguration — which is actually better as southbound New Hampshire buses turn onto Princeton Place to travel north on Georgia Avenue.

Below is a rough outline of where curb bump outs could occur on the north side of the street. Depending upon tree selection and planting location, this should create room for 4 to 6 new trees.

Bump outs on Princeton Place could create room for 4-6 new trees, depending upon tree selection and planting location.

While cost is always a factor, when I mentioned this opportunity to some folks at DDOT during a recent meeting, there was some excitement about this. Narrowing the street would improve vehicular safety, narrowing the crossway at Georgia would improve pedestrian safety, and the new trees would increase the overall tree canopy — all DDOT goals.

So what are your thoughts, shall we make this a priority in 2020?

 

DDOT to Repair Sidewalks on Georgia Avenue from Princeton Place to Ingraham Street, NW, in June

June 5, 2019

Here’s a heads up that I’ve just received, DDOT is scheduled to repair the sidewalks, curbs, and gutters on Georgia Avenue north of Princeton Place beginning later this week or early next week. Full announcement from DDOT below:

The District Department of Transportation (DDOT) will begin repairing the sidewalks, curbs and gutter on Georgia Avenue from Princeton Place to Ingraham Street NW on or about June 7, 2019.

Construction is scheduled to be completed by July 7, 2019, if weather permits.

In order to keep the inconvenience to residents, businesses and their customers to a minimum, the repair work will be done during non-rush hours only.

The contractor is authorized to work Monday through Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. The contractor is also authorized to work Saturdays from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.

During construction at least one lane in each direction will be open to traffic. However, curbside parking will not be allowed on some blocks of Georgia Avenue NW during the construction working days.

Parking restriction signs will be posted at least 72 hours in advance at locations where parking will not be allowed. These signs will notify the duration of “No Parking”, dates of “No Parking” and contact information of the engineer in charge.

Thank you for your patience and understanding during the repair work. Should you have any problems, concerns or suggestions; please contact me at the information below.

If Removing On-Street Parking Spaces Also Removed an Open-Air Drug Market, Would That Be a Fair Trade?

April 25, 2019

The 600 block of Newton Place, NW, has been a difficult street for many years. It is narrow. It does not have street trees. And, it has had an on-again, off-again history of open-air drug dealing. We all know that crime is a complicated thing to solve. Clearly, the police play a role, and continue to do so on Newton Place. Social Services also play a key role and we are increasingly identifying public safety issues that are better suited for agencies geared toward addressing addiction and homelessness, as examples.

But what about planning and design? The short answer is yes. Poorly planned roads, streets, and infrastructure can similarly invite criminal activity or at least provide a desirable environment for it.

The 600 block of Newton Place is one area that I believe rises to this threshold.

One recent Saturday as I was walking down the block, I noticed that a brand new Audi A6 was parked on the block, about mid block, with out to District tags. As I was walking, another vehicle with out of District tags parked on the block. The new driver got out of their car and walked up to the Audi where the two then proceeded to conduct a drug transaction. This was shortly before noon.

It got me thinking — if the on-street parking on the block is being used as part of an active drug market, is it serving the community? Moreover, would there be a significant hardship to the neighbors if much of the on-street parking was removed? Even more, if the parking could be removed, could a portion of it be repurposed for street trees on a block where no street trees currently exist.

The overview below shows the area in question. Today, Newton Place is one-way eastbound. There is no parking on the north side of the street and 22 parking spaces on the south side of the street.

(Overview of the 600 block of Newton Place, NW. The red arrow indicates off-street parking currently unused.)

Of the 22 parking spaces currently on Newton Place, I would recommend keeping the five between Georgia Avenue and the entrance to the alley. These support the Ward 1 Senior Wellness Center and the businesses on Georgia Avenue. Also, any resident can park in them afterhours for free. Lastly, as trash and recycling is collected in alleys in Ward 1, keeping the street in its current configuration up to the alley entrance would not create a new hardship for these core city services.

This would leave 17 parking spaces that could potentially be removed. In walking the alleys both north and south of Newton Place, with few exceptions each property has access to off-street parking. Much of it is used, though some of it isn’t. In one case, the apartment building at 636 Newton Place appears to have room for 4 or 5 parking spaces, but the area is fenced off and currently unavailable. This wouldn’t have to stay this way.

(Parking area at the rear of 646 Newton Place, NW, that is currently fenced off.)

In reviewing the current inventory of current and potential alley parking for the properties along Newton Place, about 10 new spaces could be accommodated without significant hardship — this means that the net loss of parking would be 7 spaces.

The question becomes, would losing 7 spaces overall on Newton Place be an agreeable trade off if it also removed the opportunity for out of District vehicles to park there and conduct their drug business on a daily basis?

As a potential bonus, presuming there were wide support for decreasing on-street parking on Newton Place, a portion of the former parking area could be repurposed for about 8 new street trees (see image below).

(Could a portion of the parking on Newton Place be repurposed for new trees?)

As stated at the beginning of this post, Newton is a narrow street currently consisting of one travel lane and one lane of parking. The average width of an American car is 6 feet, meaning that if just 3 feet of the street formerly dedicated to parking were repurposed for a line of street trees, the travel lane would increase in width by 3 feet. The overall result could be a street with less crime, a safer street for travelers, and a more beautiful street with the addition of a tree canopy.

DDOT Issues Notice of Intent to Install HAWK Signal at Georgia and Lamont Street, NW

March 29, 2019

Yesterday, ANC1A received a Notice of Intent from DDOT for the “Installation of New High intensity Activated Crosswalk (HAWK) Signal at the Intersections of Georgia A venue and Lamont Street, NW, NOI 19-85-TESD.” This is very good news as it is part of a longstanding community-led effort to improve pedestrian safety along Park View’s Georgia Avenue corridor.

According to the notice:

The proposed modification is result of traffic analysis performed by DDOT to advance recommendations to improve safety at various pedestrian crossings in Ward 1, as stated in Director Marootian’ s May 4, 2018 letter to Councilmember Nadeau. Original recommendation to relocate the near-side northbound bus stop to far-side of the intersection could not advance due to the presence of loading zone, tree boxes and fire hydrant. Therefore, both the crosswalks at this intersection will be maintained and will be controlled by a new HAWK signal.

HAWK signal control can provide for the safe and efficient movement of vehicular and pedestrian traffic at this intersection, and will provide positive direction to motorists, pedestrians and bicyclists operating through and in the immediate vicinity. The proposed new HAWK signal on Georgia Avenue at Lamont Street, NW, will be timed to operate in harmony with adjacent traffic signals on the Georgia Avenue corridor to minimize disruptions to through traffic.

All comments on this subject matter must be filed in writing by Wednesday, May 8, 2019 (Thirty business days after the date of this notice), with the District Department of Transportation (DDOT), Traffic Engineering and Signals Division at 55 M Street, SE, Washington, D.C. 20003. If you would like to check the status of the Notice of Intent (NOI), please visit DDOT’s website at:
http://ddot.dc.gov/service/ddot-notice-intent. If you have trouble accessing the NOI site or are unable to do so, please contact the DDOT Customer Service Clearinghouse at 202-671-2800.

Here is an explanation from DDOT on how HAWK signals operate.


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