Posted tagged ‘trees’

Mayor Bowser Launches DC Tree Watering Application to Identify Trees Needing Community Watering Assistance

June 22, 2017

With the hot temperatures and lack of rain we’ve had recently, I wanted to highlight the new DC Tree Watering Application which Mayor Bowser announced last week. Many residents in the neighborhood have worked hard to add new trees where we can, and are still actively doing what we can to increase the tree canopy in the area. It is particularly important in our current weather to keep new trees watered, and this app helps identify where those trees are. The text of the Mayor’s announcement follows the screen shot below.

(Screen shot of Web app, click to enter.)

News Release:

(WASHINGTON, DC) – [June 12, 2017], Mayor Muriel Bowser launched of the new DC Tree Watering Application during her Ward 6 community walk. The event, which featured a demonstration of the District Department of Transportation’s (DDOT) innovative new app, highlighted the value of and need for community assistance in keeping newly planted trees hydrated. The Mayor was joined at the launch by DDOT Deputy Director Jeff Marootian, DDOT’s Urban Forestry Division (UFD) team, and members of the community.

“We are committed to embracing smart technology across city government, and with the launch of the new DC Tree Watering App we are encouraging all District residents to help support our urban forestry,” said Mayor Bowser. “This past planting season, as part of DC’s commitment to protecting and enhancing the environment, we planted 8,200 new trees throughout the city. Now, we want to see them flourish and we invite everyone to help. Watering is the easiest and most affordable way for residents to help, and this app will allow us to coordinate our efforts.”

Through the DC Tree Watering App, users can locate trees in all eight wards that need watering, tag trees they water, and upload photos of the trees being watered. In addition, users can report trees in need of care (e.g. a tree has a beehive), and the UFD will review all reports to determine the best means of care for each tree. The app also includes a story map with information about tree species found throughout Washington, DC.

The District maintains more than 215,000 trees throughout the city. During the last tree planting season (October 2016 through April 2017), the city planted 8,200 trees, increasing urban tree canopy coverage of the District to 38.7 percent.
The launch of the app is part of Back to Basics DC, a multi-week celebration of the day-to-day work that keeps Washington, DC moving forward. Follow Back to Basics DC on social media using #backtobasicsDC.
Residents can find the app at treewatering.ddot.dc.gov/treewatering, and visit ddot.dc.gov to learn more about the District’s urban forestry.

New Trees Pop Up as Part of Annual DDOT Tree Planting

February 14, 2017
One of two replacement trees on Otis Place.

One of two replacement trees on Otis Place.

As someone very interested in maintaining and increasing the neighborhoods tree canopy, I like this time of year when new trees are planted in our empty tree boxes. I also recognize that not all streets have tree planting areas, which is why I worked with Casey Trees last year to make trees available for residents in central Park View as part of a community tree planting. I’ll continue to look for ways to bring trees to treeless streets to help with the neighborhoods tree desert.

I’ve noticed a number of new trees planted in the past weeks around the neighborhood and thought I would highlight where they are. In looking at the official 2016-2017 tree planting map (below) one can drill down to find both locations of new trees and which species of trees have been planted. In reviewing the map, I’ve also noticed that some of the new trees aren’t on the map. For instance, and oak was planted in an empty tree box in front of 610 Rock Creek Church Rd and two new trees were planted on Otis Place by the school. The Otis Place trees replace two of the eight new trees that were planted last season. Even with community efforts to water those trees last year, the two at each end didn’t make it and have been replaced. I think we’ll see better luck next year.

One of the reasons why the tree planting map appears to add so few trees to our area is precisely because we’ve been  so successful in reporting empty tree boxes and getting them filled in the past few years. I suspect that the map will continue to include few new trees in the near future, again because of this reason.

2017-tree-planting-map(Screen capture from 2016-2017 DDOT Tree planting map showing locations of new street trees this planting season.)

After Long Wait, New Topsoil Coming to Tree Boxes on Otis

November 4, 2016

Getting the new trees established on the Otis Place side of the Park View school has been both an exercise in patience and rewarding in seeing how residents pull together to get things done. Earlier this year, when the summer heat threatened the new trees’ survival, neighbors who live near the trees pulled together, came up with a weekly watering schedule, and cared for the trees for the entirety of this growing season.

Park View neighbors working together to add fill dirt to the tree boxes on Otis Place in September.

Park View neighbors working together to add fill dirt to the tree boxes on Otis Place in September.

A related issue has been getting topsoil to fill the tree boxes in the same section of Otis Place. Initially, I was told that the city would not supply topsoil even though DDOT had created the tree box areas that had subsequently sunk by 5″ or more. In September, the tree watering group attempted to find free fill dirt to accomplish the task. While there was some success in finding the free dirt, ultimately much more topsoil was needed than we could find.

I’m happy to report that after working with the Mayor’s office and DDOT, this work has finally been scheduled to be accomplished today by the Urban Forestry Administration (soil, mulch, labor) and should occur in the morning between 8:00 am and 1:00 pm.

Update 9:01 am:

DDOT’s UFA is already out filling the tree boxes with topsoil and mulch. See photos below.

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Park View Community Tree Planting Nets 11 New Neighborhood Trees

October 25, 2016

tree planting(Casey Trees and volunteers planting two new oak trees on Park Road at Warder Place.)

After nearly a year of planning between Commissioner Boese, neighbors, and Casey Trees the community had a successful community tree planting on October 22nd that increased the area tree canopy with 11 new trees. The focus area on Saturday was between Warder and Park Place, from Lamont at the south to Newton Place on the north. All but two of the trees were planted in residents’ front yards, which in the focus area is where the original trees were located over a century ago.

Map showing the types and locations of the trees that were planted on October 22nd.

Map showing the types and locations of the trees that were planted on October 22nd.

Residents familiar with the community tree planting area will know that these streets have no street trees or room for tree boxes. Also, over the past few years some of the few remaining large trees have been cut down as a result of development. While not every property has a yard large enough for a tree, many do … and several residents have also planted new trees in the past few years which helps with restoring the tree canopy. Still, the central core of the neighborhood has a long way to go to tree it up to its original tree level.

Even with the 11 new trees just planted, there are still opportunities for new trees throughout the neighborhood, both east and west of Georgia Avenue. Moving forward, Casey Trees will continue to with Commissioner Boese and residents to identify additional opportunities for more trees.

Saturday’s Casey Trees Community Tree Planting was a great success even with the strong winds and low temperatures. It would not have been possible without the support of the Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development’s office, which supported the planting of two oak trees on the southwest corner of Park Road and Warder Street. The support of Colony Club (who supplied coffee) and Heat Da Spot Cafe (who provided a delicious lunch) were also greatly appreciated and helped with the event’s success.

Below are a few photos from the event.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA(Getting organized in the morning while enjoying coffee from Colony Club.)

img_1694(After a day of tree planting, enjoying a great lunch from Heat Da Spot.)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Volunteers Needed to Help Water Trees on Otis Place

July 27, 2016
ANC1A Commissioners Richard DuBeshter and Kent Boese watering trees on Otis Place

ANC1A Commissioners Richard DuBeshter and Kent Boese watering trees on Otis Place

With the excessive heat we’ve been experiencing the past  few days, our efforts to tree up the neighborhood are going to need some help.  The eight new trees that were planted on Otis Place between the school and the recreation center are one place in particular that needs our help.

Last night I was able to enlist the help of fellow ANC 1A Commissioner Richard DuBeshter to fill the water bags on each of the trees and it really didn’t take that long … but the bag need to be filled about once a week.

What we need is a watering plan for the remainder of the summer and for next year. I can take care of the supplies and access to water, but we need some volunteers to take turns filling the bags. If you are able to help keep these trees alive, please contact me via email at 1a08 (at) anc.gov.com.

With Excessive Heat, Young Trees Need Watering Assistance

July 25, 2016
Filling a tree watering bag.

Filling a tree watering bag.

With the hot temperatures we’ve been experiencing recently, everyone is looking for ways to cool off and stay hydrated. Getting enough water is not only important for people and pets during heat waves, it is also important for our city trees — and especially trees that have been planted for less than three years.

According to Casey Trees, newly planted trees — those that have been in the ground less than three years — require 25 gallons of water, approximately 1.5 inches of rainfall, per week to survive. During extended periods of little or no rainfall and/or high temperatures, trees may need our help getting the water they need. (Read more about tree watering here).

It is important to remember that all new trees need our help, which includes trees planted on both private property and in public tree boxes.

Casey Trees also created the following video on how to water a tree.

Tree Work Continues in the Neighborhood: Here are DDOT’s Maps Showing Where

June 28, 2016

There’s been a lot of tree work in the neighborhood recently. Most noticeably with large street trees being removed. I’ve seen a few of the large trees that have come down, and while many look healthy at first glance they’ve been hollow inside. In looking around the DDOT Website, I found a number of interactive maps including the following map showing the locations of trees to be removed this season.

Tree removal map 2016(Click on map for navigable tree removal map.)

I also found this interesting map that shows the locations of street trees in D.C. and give an indication on how large they are.

DDOT street tree canopy(Map showing current street trees and open tree spaces. It also indicates the size of the tree.)

And, of course, my favorite is where the new trees will be planted in the coming 2016/2017 winter season. That map is accessible below.

New tree planting map 2016(Click to access DDOT’s tree planting map to see where new trees will be planted in the coming season.)


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