Posted tagged ‘parks and green spaces’

Park View Community Partners Green Space Survey Released at Park Morton Steering Committee Meeting

March 30, 2016

At the Park Morton Steering Committee meeting held on March 24th, Park View Community Partners (the development team) walked through the results of the Green Space Survey that they’d conducted between January 29th and February 8th. The slide deck from that presentation is available on the Park View Engage Web site and also available here.

Overall, 201  people participated in the survey (with one caveat, it is possible that one person took the survey 36 times as the IP address was the same as were the responses). The purpose of the survey was to solicit feedback on the desired programming of the park elements at both the Park Morton and Bruce-Monroe sites. That can best be illustrated in the following two charts.

Question four focused on green space elements at the Park Morton site:

Park Morton Green Space chart

Question five focused on green space elements at the Bruce-Monroe site:

Bruce Monroe survey use

At the meeting, I offered two suggestions to the development team to gather information to help them better understand what park uses would meet community expectations. With the warmer weather, I suggested that the team visit the Bruce-Monroe site on several occasions to engage those who visit the site and learn about the activities (both existing and absent) that people would like to have at the site. I also suggested that the team visit the parks, playgrounds, and community gardens surrounding the Bruce-Monroe site and ask similar questions.

Overall, it would be both interesting and helpful to the planning process to develop a broad understanding of the recreational activities that currently exist in the community as well as activities that people would like to have in the area that aren’t currently available. It would also be useful to know why people choose to visit some greenspaces and not others — for example, are roads like Georgia Avenue, Park Place, or Sherman Avenue considered barriers to some?

Whether these suggestions are acted upon or not, it is clear to me that more work is needed to understand what the programming needs are for our local greenspaces than can be achieved through an online survey.

 

Where do you take your dog to walk, run, socialized with other dogs, and just have a good time being a dog?

October 13, 2015
The area at Bruce Monroe Park closed to dogs recently.

The area at Bruce Monroe Park closed to dogs recently.

Last week, dogs were barred from the fenced in area of Bruce Monroe Park near the community garden and the gates were locked.  According to the Department of Parks and Recreation, the area was chained off because it was not a legitimate dog park and is, instead, officially designated as a stormwater management area for the community garden. Borderstan has a good overview of the story and members of the community who want access restored have started a Facebook page called “Save The Bruce Monroe Community Park Dog Run.”

ANC 1A10 Commissioner Rashida Brown is working to schedule a community meeting to sort this out, and I certainly support her efforts. While the short term outcome may indeed be to restore access to the fenced in area, that won’t solve the problem in the long-term.

This all leads me to ask, whether at Bruce Monroe Park or elsewhere — Where do you take your dog to walk, run, socialized with other dogs, and just have a good time being a dog? I’ve seen dogs playing at Wangari Gardens, at the triangle park at Rock Creek Church Road and Park Place, and at the unofficial dog park at 11th Street and Park Road. However, with no official dog parks in the northeastern corner of Ward 1, what spaces have you found that provide a safe environment for your dog to exercise and play with other dogs?

 

New Seasonal Park on K Street — Could this Work on Georgia Avenue?

July 16, 2015
The ParKIT sign expalin

The ParKIT sign explaining the concept.

On Tuesday, a new Parklet was opened on K Street in front of the Gensler building at 2020 K Street NW. The seasonal park takes the place of two parking spaces. As I checked it out (and I know others in the community have also been thinking along these lines too), I wondered if a seasonal, temporary park would be something that could be done on Georgia Avenue. More-so, I wondered if a parklet could be paired with a bike corral in an area like DC Reynolds, Looking Glass Lounge, and Walters.

One of the issues with Georgia Avenue is that the sidewalks are too narrow to accommodate outdoor cafe space. Furthermore, in an area like the 3600 block of Georgia, on a popular night their just aren’t enough bike racks to accommodate cyclists. If we could identify an area where three parking spaces aren’t needed, or, where the benefit of removing them for a seasonal park and bike corral would outweigh the loss of three spaces, we might be able to create the outdoor vibrancy that is definitely needed on Georgia.

Parklet(The new parklet on K Street, NW.)

While the parklet on K Street is a great place to sit, read, and relax, these aren’t the only activities that could be accommodated. As the photo below shows, the space could also be configured as an outdoor cafe or summer garden. This is precisely the type of activity that would help enliven Georgia Avenue but that we can’t accommodate with our current sidewalks.

San Francisco parklet(1300 Fulton Street Parklet (Hosted by Cafe Abir) Photo By: SF Planning (AS))

So the questions become: 1) Would the community be interesting in swapping out a few parking spaces for some type of seasonal park? 2) What activities should this park support? and 3) Ideally, where should this park be located?

Is There Room in Smaller Parks for Functional Public Sculpture?

April 17, 2015

Over the years, I’ve given a lot of thought to D.C.’s parks, playgrounds, and green spaces. Perhaps this is partially due to how little accessible green space we currently have in Park View. As vast amounts of land just aren’t going to become available anytime soon, its easier to think about how current parkland could be improved to increase their value to the community without decreasing their usefulness.

The Park View Recreation Center is an obvious site where — though it is greatly improved — there is still room for additional improvement. Fortunately, the small field house is currently being renovated which should add much needed space for community meetings, birthday parties, or any other community event without impacting the Rec Center’s programs.

With regards to our smaller park areas, amenities should be in scale with their sites, add beauty to the community, and enhance or encourage activities that already exist. For an example, just over a year ago I suggested that the small park area at Kenyon and Georgia Avenue would be an ideal place for Washington’s original von Steuben memorial (either the original or a replica). The site is part of what was once Schuetzen Park, the original site of the memorial. It is also a small site well suited to a small public sculpture.

The Fountain of Three Graces in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin.

The Fountain of Three Graces in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin.

In the same spirit, a small work of art would also be well suited to the small triangle park at Rock Creek Church Road and Park Place (aka Reserve 321-A). Having observed people use this park for years, I’ve seen two primary activities there — young adults playing catch and dog owners playing with their companions or just taking them for a walk. Keeping this in mind, a sculpture on the site would need to be small, out of the way, and ideally useful. One idea could be a small fountain.

In thinking about fountain types, I think the Fountain of Three Graces in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, offers a good example of the characteristics that such a fountain in our area could embrace. Its relatively simple, it has no front or back being instead in the round, the water catch basins are at ground level, and it includes lighting to illuminate the fountain at night. Why I’m particularly drawn to the fountain idea, and one with ground level catch basins, goes back to all the dog owners I see using the park. If it is possible to install such an amenity, it would be nice if the fountain could double as a place where dogs could get a drink of water, especially in the hot summer weather.

Many of our smaller parks serve a variety of needs, but at most have infrastructure limited to sidewalks and street lights. This seems like a missed opportunity, and one that should be fully developed with community input. Whether a fountain here, or a sculpture there, or something entirely different, D.C. needs a master plan for parks and public spaces beyond what is strictly maintained by the Department of Parks and Recreation.

Design and placement aside, the image below shows how such a fountain could look:

Park Place Fountain(Overall concept of what a fountain could look like in our smaller parks.)

 

Improvements in Progress at Bruce Monroe Park

July 25, 2014
One of the two new water fountains at the Bruce Monroe Park.

One of the two new water fountains at the Bruce Monroe Park.

The long awaited improvements to the Bruce Monroe Park originally announcement in April 2013 are finally underway. $200,000 was programmed to improve the park in 2013 by including two new water fountains and a shade structure — including seating, large enough to accommodate gatherings and programming.

It has taken a lot of effort and advocacy, but the improvements are finally underway with the goal of being completed by July 30th. To date, the two (2) water fountains have been installed, the shade structure is almost complete and eight (8) of the benches will be installed on July 25th (today) if all goes well.

The photo below shows the shade structure nearing completion.

Bruce Monroe shade structure(New shade structure at Bruce Monroe Park)

The plan below shows the location of the shade structure, the two water fountains, and the proposed location of the benches.

Bruce Monroe Improvement map

Small Improvements Headed for the Bruce-Monroe “Park” Site

June 13, 2014
Detail from general concept drawing showing approximate design for shade structure.

Detail from general concept drawing showing approximate design for shade structure.

While it was first announced in April 2013 that $200,000 of improvements would be made at the Bruce-Monroe Park at Georgia Avenue and Irving Street, NW, … when the promised delivery date of December 2013 came and went there concern arose in the neighborhood that this project would not be completed. Residents in partnership with ANC1B, the Georgia Avenue Community Development Task Force, and eventually ANC1A began working together to get the shade structure, two drinking fountains, and additional seating installed that the money was programmed to provide.

Finally, it looks like the project is moving forward again. A week ago a general contractor was selected for the project and the shade structure, benches and water fountains have been ordered. Currently, the projected completion date is scheduled for the end of July/beginning of August.

 

DPR’s Former Headquarters Could Be a Vibrant Hub of Community Activity

April 24, 2014

In reviewing DPR’s recently released Play DC Vision Framework Document, I began to reflect upon the former DPR Headquarters property located at 3149 Sixteenth Street, NW, and the adjoining park to the north. The DPR Website refers to the playground as the 16th Street Playground, although historically it was known as either the Powell Recreation Center or the Johnson-Powell Playground after the two schools that were once located on the neighboring properties. Both schools are now long gone and been replaced by the Columbia Heights Education Campus to the south.

But, back to the parkland and building. DPR moved from the 16th Street property t0 their present U Street location in 2012 leaving the building empty. The neighboring park was last renovated in 2011 and seems well used and popular when I walk past it. However, both properties appear to fall far short of their potential and a review of the Vision Framework doesn’t seem to give them any particular importance (although that could change between now and the final master plan).

16th Street DPR headquarters(Map showing location of former DPR headquarters)

The landmark building, listed on the National Register in 1986, is large and could accommodate any number of functions — from office space on the upper floors for non-profits, to gallery space for rotating art, photography, and history exhibits, to being one of the few publicly accessible meeting spaces in Ward 1.

The parkland is relatively large, and while the playground and tennis courts are popular, the baseball diamond and large grassy area in the back are lesser used. They were completely empty last time I visited, but I’m betting the Columbia Heights Education Campus makes good use of them. I’ve begun to wonder if outdoor lighting and an upgrade would make the baseball diamond a more attractive amenity for both the nearby Bell Multicultural High School and the greater community. I also wonder if there is enough room for some additional uses if the playground and building site were better integrated. Perhaps there would be room for a community garden or some other recreational amenity that is otherwise lacking in the surrounding community.

The Chateauesque Embassy Building No. 10, former headquarters of DPR.

The Chateauesque Embassy Building No. 10, former headquarters of DPR.

While identifying programming and building community consensus may seem like the most obvious hurdles to improving the property, they aren’t the only ones. The properties are among the many in the District of Columbia that are still technically owned by the Federal Government, but whose jurisdiction & maintenance has been transferred to the District of Columbia. A significant aspect of this duel scenario is that the Federal Government transferred day-to-day operations of the properties to D.C. with a restriction that the properties must be used for or support recreation purposes.

This poses less of a problem for the outdoor spaces, but it does restrict what the building can be used for. This, no doubt, has played a role in the building’s current vacant status. The building is also in need of significant repair and upgrades — and I would imagine that restoring a building it doesn’t own or currently use is low on the District’s list of priorities.

Yet, I think that if the community were able to come up with a good plan and vision for both the building and the parkland, funding of that vision could be found — and perhaps some of that funding could come from the Federal Government. A good example of this is a short distance to the south, where after successful outreach Meridian Hill Park is in the midst of improvements from the National Park Service.

Powell Playground(View of the playground area from the parking lot (south) at the former DPR headquarters)


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