Fish in the Hood Close to Re-Opening, Still Needs Your Support.

Posted October 9, 2018 by Kent
Categories: Community Involvement, Restaurants, Small Businesses

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I know that many neighbors in the greater Park View area have been watching Bill White make repairs to Fish in the Hood and wondering when this beloved restaurant will reopen for business. It has been a long road since an April 14, 2017, fire shuttered Fish in the Hood, but now based on a reports on Petworth News and NBC4, most of the repairs have been made. The only major hurdle left if funding to make the necessary final tweaks and to stock the restaurant with delicious fish.

To that Bill has been selling personal items to generate funds and also has a GoFunMe Campaign running to help achieve the goal of raising the $16,000 dollars needed to reopen his doors.

Fish in the Hood has been an excellent neighbor and business. Donating $20 or more to this campaign is a good investment in Fish in the Hood, and in Georgia Avenue. I’m positive that Bill can reach his goal and as of Tuesday, 10/9, he had less than $3,000 to go.

Neighbors can help Fish in the Hood reopen by making a small donation at GoFundMe.

Next Park View Cleanup This Saturday, October 6th!

Posted October 4, 2018 by Kent
Categories: Community Involvement, Volunteerism

Tags: ,

Georgia Avenue Thrive will hold their next neighborhood cleanup this Saturday at 10 a.m. beginning at the corner of Georgia Avenue and Irving Street.

Volunteers will receive free stainless steel straws, thanks to District Bridges. They’ll also debut 10 new, top-notch trash pickers, thanks to a generous donation from DC Reynolds, a wonderful friend of the community.

See the flyer below for more details.

Sustained Advocacy Results in More Trees for Park View School Project

Posted October 3, 2018 by Kent
Categories: Restoration repair and maintenance, Schools, Streets and Trees

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I’m happy to report that I’ve been able to get 10-13 new trees added to the landscaping plans for the Bruce-Monroe @ Park View School project. But it took a lot of doggedness and refusing to take no for an answer for nearly a month.

While one would think that the landscaping plans would have been discussed at a School Improvement Team (SIT) meeting, of which I’m a member, they really weren’t. Furthermore, it has been a few months since the last SIT has met. This is an area that I’m extremely interested in as the school grounds have long been on my list of places where we could potentially get large shade trees to help address the tree desert in the middle of the neighborhood.

Site plan of the school showing location of new bioretention areas to be added at Bruce-Monroe @ Park View.

I was surprised when I inspected the school grounds in late August that bioretention areas were being added to the grounds at the front of the building, prompting me to request a copy of the landscaping plans on August 30th. After four requests, a copy of the plan set was finally shared with me on September 6th. A quick review of the plans showed that no trees were being added in the front of the building.

Immediately upon seeing the lack of trees on the site, I contacted the construction team, and later the DCPS project team, and asked about adding trees to the landscaping plan. The initial feedback I received was that trees would interfere with the bioretention areas, and that the bioretention areas were required by the Department of Energy and the Environment (DOEE).

Refusing to give up, I also contacted DDOT’s Urban Forestry Administration and requested a site visit. I also had a long conversation with DOEE which informed me that green infrastructure elements are required, but that bioretention areas were one of four ways that a project could meet that requirement. Another way was to plant trees, and that in many ways DOEE has a preference for trees but leaves the selection of which way to go to the project team.

Armed with this knowledge, I shared with DCPS that trees were an option and that if push came to shove trees would be the better choice on Warder Street.

Following DDOT’s site visit to the school, and after nearly a month of dedicated oversight, I was finally informed on September 21st that both the Warder and Newton Place sides of the building could accommodate trees without disturbing the bioretention areas already planned. This will include three trees on Warder Street and one on Newton that will mature between 60′ and 70′, helping expand the tree canopy. See the illustrations below for approximate locations and suggested species.

The illustration below also helps provide an idea of what each of the recommended trees will look like when mature.

Fall Fun Fest is this Sunday at the Soldiers’ Home — Here’s the Guide to Events

Posted September 28, 2018 by Kent
Categories: Armed Forces Retirement Home, Celebrations, Sports leisure and entertainment

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The Armed Forces Retirement Home & Friends of the Soldiers Home’s annual Fall Fun Fest is this Sunday, September 30th. Below is the Guide to the day’s events to help you decide when to go.

ABRA Fines Kraken Axes $12,000 on Six Violations in September 26th Order

Posted September 28, 2018 by Kent
Categories: ABRA, Development, Small Businesses

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Kraken Axes has opened in the former Murray’s at 3400 Georgia Avenue.

On August 3rd I shared that Kraken Axes had gotten into trouble as part of an ABRA investigation, which resulted in investigators recommending denial of issuing them a liquor license and citing three counts where Kraken had violated the DC Municipal Regulations.

Kraken Axes representatives were ordered to appear before ABRA on August 15, 2018, to demonstrate their qualifications for licensure. All parties appear to have agreed to certain conditions to resolve the matter and ABRA issued its Order outlining this agreement on September 26, 2018.

In the ABRA Order, Kraken agrees to pay $12,000 in fines — $2,000 for each of six first level primary tier violations outlined in the order. The violations range from:

  • engaging or permitting another party to engage in the illegal sale of alcohol;
  • holding or permitting another party to host events and invited members of the public on the premises, and storing alcohol at the premises even though they lacked an appropriate Certificate of Occupancy; and,
  • interfering or attempting to interfere with an investigation.

In addition, Anna Valero and the Applicant agreed not to have a direct of indirect ownership interest in District Still, LLC, Foggy Bottom, LLC, or any other D.C. licensed off-premise retailer so long as the parties hold a direct or indirect ownership inters in an on-premise retail licensed business.

Additional details are included in the ABRA Order.

More Housing Proposed for 727 Kenyon Street, NW

Posted September 25, 2018 by Kent
Categories: Development, Housing

Tags: ,


(727 Kenyon Street, NW, is on the left of the driveway in the photo above.)

A rather straight forward BZA Case that will be before ANC1A on October 10th is the proposed conversion of the single family house at 727 Kenyon Street, NW, into a three-unit apartment building. The structure is on a large lot with the proposal meeting the requirements of the properties RF-1 Zone with the exception of a third unit. Properties zoned RF-1 only permit two units as a matter of right, but allow 3 units by special exception.

The developer presented the project at the September ANC1A meeting and will return in October for a vote. As presented, benefits of the proposal in addition to an additional unit than otherwise allowed are:

  • the property is large enough for off street parking, and three off street parking spaces will be created;
  • the curb cut would be removed, increasing on street parking by at least one space; and,
  • each of the new units would be three bedroom plus den, meaning they would be large enough for families.

Below are some drawings of the plans from the BZA case and developer.

(Reconfigured façade)

Floor plans after the jump Read the rest of this post »

DDOT Bike Lane Pop-up on Kenyon Offers Good Insight

Posted September 24, 2018 by Kent
Categories: Bikes, DDOT, Streets and Trees, streetscape, traffic, Transportation

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The pop-up bike land on Kenyon, 9/21/18.

As part of Parking Day on Friday, September 21st this year, DDOT constructed a temporary pop-up bike lane on the 400 block of Kenyon Street, NW. This was an extremely valuable experience as DDOT is looking at ways to incorporate a permanent protected bi-directional bike lane on Irving Street between Michigan Avenue, NE, and Warder Street, NW. The temporary bike lane on Kenyon offered a good opportunity for DDOT to get feedback from residents as well as watch how traffic adjusted to accommodate the lanes.

Overall, I believe the bike lane pop-up was a success due to the information learned to help inform the next steps. As expected, comments related to DDOT’s plans are mixed, with some strongly in favor and others opposed. In addition to making Kenyon one lane during rush hour, some are concerned that a protected bike lane will reduce on-street parking. All of this would still need to be worked out.

Although, based on the boards that were shared with the community, it does appear that there is room for protected bike lanes, bump outs for new trees on Warder Street, and new parking along Park Place IF the suggestions proposed by DDOT meet with approval. Its difficult because every opportunity is accompanied by a trade off.

(Discussing the crosstown protected bike lane project with DDOT during the pop up event.)

Bump Outs

I was really exited to see that DDOT has been paying attention to much of what I’ve been suggesting over the years, especially with regards to incorporating bump outs on Warder Street to create new locations for street trees. See plan below.

(Proposal to incorporate bulb outs on Warder Street, creating areas for new trees.)

In DDOT’s proposal, they suggest 11 areas where bump outs could be created. But, this would remove 20 on-street parking spaces. As it is, the bike lanes may also reduce on-street parking spaces. This is a difficult trade off considering that demands on parking are increasing rather than decreasing. I’ve already met with the members of the project team at DDOT’s offices to review the plans and will be going over them block-by-block to see if there are missed opportunities or better locations for bump outs, and hope to get an initial survey completed before the end of October.

Potential Increase in Parking

In order to counter balance the impact on parking along Warder and Kenyon, DDOT is looking at the possibility of placing parking on both sides of Park Place, NW.

(DDOT’s updated plan showing parking on both sides of Park Place, NW)

The benefits of placing parking on both sides of Park Place would be that cars in addition to bollards would help protect the bike lane along the Soldiers’ Home. Additionally, it would reduce Park Place to a single travel lane, greatly reducing the speed of traffic along the street which has long been a problem. It would also increase neighborhood parking by more than the spaces lost elsewhere due to other aspects of the project. The biggest negative would be that it would limit the vista of the Soldiers’ Home along Park Place.

While there is much to consider, DDOT is still working to get to a 30% plan by the end of the year, and presuming the development of a winning plan, implementation by the end of 2019 at the earliest.

To help the community get more information and provide more feedback, I’ve invited DDOT to be the guest at the November meeting of the Park View UNC. That will give them time to incorporate the feedback they receive during their pop-up trial last Friday.


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