Posted tagged ‘public programs’

Reminder: Preservation Program & Discussion Tonight at School

September 24, 2015

Tonight there is a community meeting on the topic of historic preservation and historic districts. The program will begin with a presentation by Kim Williams of the D.C. Historic Preservation Office. She will also be available to answer questions from the community afterward. The event is intended to support a community dialogue on the issues of preservation, neighborhood character, and development as they relate to our changing neighborhood and growing city.

Historic preservation is one way that some D.C. neighborhoods have chosen to maintain neighborhood character.  There are currently 55 historic districts and almost 27,000 structures designated and listed in the District of Columbia Inventory of Historic Sites. There are 584 D.C. historic sites and districts listed on the National Register of Historic Place.

If you plan to attend, below are the details:

Where: Bruce-Monroe @ Park View School Auditorium (3560 Warder Street)
When: 7 p.m.
Date: September 24, 2015

North Elevation Park View School 1915(North Elevation, Park View School, 1915)

Mapping Segregation in Washington DC, 1900-1950

March 4, 2015

Here’s a program that’s a collaboration among historians Mara Cherkasky and Sarah Shoenfeld of Prologue DC, historian/GIS specialist Brian Kraft of JMT Technology Group, and others. That sounds fascinating. It is funded in part by the Humanities Council of Washington, DC.

From an email:

Mapping Segregation in Washington DC, 1900-1950

Focusing on historic housing segregation in the Northwest DC neighborhoods of Bloomingdale, Columbia Heights, Mount Pleasant, Park View, and Pleasant Plains

Thursday, March 5, 6:30 pm – Great Hall, Martin Luther King Jr. Library, 901 G Street, NW

Sunday, March 8, 3 pm – Mount Pleasant Library, 16th and Lamont Streets, NW

Mapping Segregation in Washington DC is a public history project whose goal is to create a set of layered, online maps illustrating the historic segregation of DC’s housing, schools, recreational facilities, and other public venues. Our first year has been focused on racially restrictive housing covenants mostly east of Rock Creek Park, and the legal challenges to them.

Come learn why many of DC’s “historically black” neighborhoods were once exclusively white, and how more recent shifts in the city’s racial identity have been shaped by this history.

Come see for yourself the maps we’ve created to show restricted neighborhoods, the legal battle lines, and who lived where over the years. Maps tell stories that words cannot.

1952 Washington population map(Map showing demographic change in Washington based on 1930, 1940, and 1950 census data.)

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