Archive for the ‘Streets and Trees’ category

Damaged and Missing Heritage Trail Signs Continue to Dot Community

February 24, 2019

 

The Heritage Trail sign at Georgia and Morton is loose and in need of repair.

Since 2015, I’ve continued to ask why we have Heritage Trails and Markers in our neighborhoods if DDOT has no funds or staff to keep them in good repair. In order to bring attention to this issue, in March 2018 I introduced a resolution that was unanimously passed by ANC1A urging the Mayor and DDOT to address this growing issue. At that time I listed four known heritage trail signs that were missing.

Today, I personally visited the four sites of the missing signs as well as a few others to see if any progress had been made over the past year. Sadly, the four signs are still missing. I’ve also noticed two more that are loose and in need of repair.

The signs in question are:

  • Sign #16: Lift Every Voice: Georgia Ave./Pleasant Plains Heritage Trail. Damaged sign reported nearly 6 years ago, sign missing (Location: Georgia and Kenyon);
  • Sign #17: Lift Every Voice: Georgia Ave./Pleasant Plains Heritage Trail. Sign is loose in base. (Location: Georgia and Morton);
  • Sign #4: Cultural Convergence: Columbia Heights Heritage Trail. Sign missing for nearly 5 years, since at least May 2014 (Location: 14th and Monroe);
  • Sign #6: Cultural Convergence: Columbia Heights Heritage Trail. Sign missing for nearly 2 ½ years, since at least November 2016 (Location: 13th and Monroe);
  • Sign #7: Cultural Convergence: Columbia Heights Heritage Trail. Sign is loose in base. (Location: 11th and Kenyon); and,
  • Sign #17: Cultural Convergence: Columbia Heights Heritage Trail. Sign missing for nearly 3 ½ years, since at least July 2015 (Location: 16th and Harvard).

Tomorrow, I’m signed up to testify before the Committee on Transportation & the Environment at the Council’s Performance Oversight Hearing. I’ll be adding the issue of the heritage trail signs to my list of items that I need to address.

(The sign at 14th and Monroe has been missing for nearly 4 years.)

Update on Pepco’s Harvard Distribution Project

February 15, 2019

Yesterday Pepco shared that they are still on scheduled to complete their current round of construction near for the Harvard Substation Distribution Project by the end of March 2019. Since their public meeting on January 15th,  Pepco has continued its construction along Sherman Avenue and is currently finishing the manhole on Florida Avenue.

Moving forward into the next phase of work, Pepco held a meeting with DDOT and the construction team for The Wren (Wholefoods) development to discuss the next phase of work in the immediate areas along Florida and Sherman Avenues and coordinate the construction projects.

Following is a Summary of what was discussed at the Pepco Coordination Meeting:

  • DDOT inspectors reviewed Pepco TCP plans for the intersections of W Street/Florida Avenue as well as construction plans for The Wren Development;
  • Starting Monday, February 18th Pepco will begin excavation at W Street across Florida Avenue to connect conduit to the manhole currently being installed closets to the Florida/Sherman Avenue intersection;
  • Door hangers will be distributed along areas impacted as notification;
  • Construction will be during normal hours as defined DDOT;
  • Crews will ensure that steal plates are secured each night to avoid noise disturbance;
  • Pepco crews will coordinate with The Wren (crews) as they will need to install equipment needed for the new pedestrian signals that will be installed for access to The Whole Foods. This will be done as appropriate;
  • Once Pepco crews are complete with construction (March 2019), The Wren will then begin its construction to install the remainder of the equipment needed for signal installation;
  • Once The Wren has finished its construction, Pepco will then repave/resurface the intersection from curb to curb;
  • Once Pepco is ready to repave the road, crews will need to close one lane at a time in order to mill and pave the road. This should only be a 3 day operation and will be done once The Wren has completed its equipment instillation. They will do their own outreach to notify residents when construction wills start;
  • Crews are working to complete the remaining construction near the 2000 BLOCK of Sherman Avenue. Once this is complete Pepco will work to pave an mill the road in a similar fashion (one lane at a time). Pepco is currently revising their TCP’s to reflect safe accommodations along Sherman Avenue. Pepco will provide notice once they are ready to begin paving along Sherman Avenue. Crews are still on pace to complete construction along Sherman Avenue by May 2019; and,
  • Pepco still anticipates further construction on Sherman Avenue (north of Euclid), as well as Girard and Harvard Streets starting June 2019. Pepco will alert impacted residents in advance of any construction or if this time frame should change.

Below is a project overview sheet including a map of the impacted area for those who use Sherman Avenue.

DDOT Planning to Establish No-Right-On-Red at 101 DC Intersections

December 31, 2018

On December 21st, the District Department of Transportation notified Advisory Neighborhood Commissioners across Washington that they plan to establish No-Turn-on-Red restrictions at 101 signalized intersections across the city. These intersections were identified based on factors and criteria identified in the federally mandated Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices and the DC Municipal Regulations, which identify factors including an intersection’s complexity, level of pedestrian activity, potential for significant conflicts, and crash history, to name a few.

Intersection of New Hampshire Avenue, Georgia Avenue, and Rock Creek Church Road, NW

In reviewing the list of intersection where DDOT intends to make this change, the areas in and closest to Park View include the following signaled intersections:

  • Georgia Ave., New Hampshire Ave., & Rock Creek Church Rd.
  • Georgia Ave. & Otis Place
  • Georgia Ave. & Randloph St.
  • 14th St. & Columbia Rd.
  • 13th St. & Kenyon St.
  • 14th St. & Kenyon St.

Drivers will want to pay attention to all impacted intersections, though, as intersections further away from the area also will have an impact. I’ve mapped out the impacted intersections based on the DDOT list as many may find the information in map form more useful.

Overall, I like the directly DDOT is going with this as it has been my observation that many who turn right on red are more focused on seeing if the coast is clear of oncoming traffic and not always paying attention to pedestrians and others who are in crosswalks they are turning onto.

That said, I hope DDOT will use this opportunity to evaluate if a better city-wide policy is needed. I’m not entirely convinced that drivers will be able to remember which intersections will allow and which will deny them the opportunity to turn right-on-red. I’m equally doubtful that there is a solid plan for enforcement. For example, the intersection of Georgia Avenue, New Hampshire Avenue, and Rock Creek Church Road already does not allow left-turns at any time and signs are clearly posted — yet I have seen drivers do this with no consequences beyond drivers behind them using their horns and expressing anger as they pass by.

Intersection of Georgia Avenue and Otis Place, NW

 

Monthly Park View Cleanup Scheduled for Saturday, 12/1 at Georgia & Irving

November 28, 2018

The next Park View cleanup is scheduled for Saturday, December 1st. See flyer below for details.

Neighborhood Leaf Collection Begins Next Week

November 13, 2018

In reviewing DPW’s 2018 leaf collection guide, the first round of leaf collection in Park View will begin the week of November 19th — provided that leaves are raked into the treebox space this Sunday (Nov. 18th). More information is available at the DPW Website and you can also track the progress of DPW’s leaf collection crews throughout the collection period.

The maps and schedule below can also be useful.

Community Meeting on Warder & Park Place Bike Lanes this Wednesday, Nov. 7th!

November 5, 2018

DDOT has been working on plans to install protected bike lanes on Park Place, Warder Street, and the 400 block of Kenyon St. as part of their implementation of the Crosstown Multimodal Transportation effort. These bike lanes would connect Park View to Brookland by expanding the current bike lane network.

In collaboration with ANC1A, DDOT will be the featured guest at the Wednesday, November 7th Park View UNC meeting where they will provide an overview of the project and be available for questions and feedback on their current proposal. Among the ideas that DDOT is considering is additional on-street parking on Park Place and tree bump outs on Warder Street.

Please see the flyer below and check out https://www.dccycletrack.com/crosstown for additional information.

Sustained Advocacy Results in More Trees for Park View School Project

October 3, 2018

I’m happy to report that I’ve been able to get 10-13 new trees added to the landscaping plans for the Bruce-Monroe @ Park View School project. But it took a lot of doggedness and refusing to take no for an answer for nearly a month.

While one would think that the landscaping plans would have been discussed at a School Improvement Team (SIT) meeting, of which I’m a member, they really weren’t. Furthermore, it has been a few months since the last SIT has met. This is an area that I’m extremely interested in as the school grounds have long been on my list of places where we could potentially get large shade trees to help address the tree desert in the middle of the neighborhood.

Site plan of the school showing location of new bioretention areas to be added at Bruce-Monroe @ Park View.

I was surprised when I inspected the school grounds in late August that bioretention areas were being added to the grounds at the front of the building, prompting me to request a copy of the landscaping plans on August 30th. After four requests, a copy of the plan set was finally shared with me on September 6th. A quick review of the plans showed that no trees were being added in the front of the building.

Immediately upon seeing the lack of trees on the site, I contacted the construction team, and later the DCPS project team, and asked about adding trees to the landscaping plan. The initial feedback I received was that trees would interfere with the bioretention areas, and that the bioretention areas were required by the Department of Energy and the Environment (DOEE).

Refusing to give up, I also contacted DDOT’s Urban Forestry Administration and requested a site visit. I also had a long conversation with DOEE which informed me that green infrastructure elements are required, but that bioretention areas were one of four ways that a project could meet that requirement. Another way was to plant trees, and that in many ways DOEE has a preference for trees but leaves the selection of which way to go to the project team.

Armed with this knowledge, I shared with DCPS that trees were an option and that if push came to shove trees would be the better choice on Warder Street.

Following DDOT’s site visit to the school, and after nearly a month of dedicated oversight, I was finally informed on September 21st that both the Warder and Newton Place sides of the building could accommodate trees without disturbing the bioretention areas already planned. This will include three trees on Warder Street and one on Newton that will mature between 60′ and 70′, helping expand the tree canopy. See the illustrations below for approximate locations and suggested species.

The illustration below also helps provide an idea of what each of the recommended trees will look like when mature.


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