Posted tagged ‘Bruce Monroe Park’

Zumba Class at Bruce Monroe Park This Wednesday

May 19, 2015

From the Core Studios is planning outdoor classes at Bruce Monroe Park this summer (at the corner of Irving Street and Georgia Avenue), which will be held under the Pavilion rain or shine. The following details are from their class announcement for the Wednesday Zumba class:

Zumba Jam- Bump the Hump!  

From the Core Zumba(Zumba at From the Core Studios)

Come celebrate our Bump the Hump day on Wednesday with an invigorating, high-energy Zumba class with dance instructor extraordinaire Lola! Disco lights and great music under the night sky will have you gyrating around within moments of arrival. We will be holding our Bump the Hump Zumba Class at the Bruce Monroe Park- and when you sign up, bring a friend free. Just email From the Core a name ahead of time so they have the slot reserved for your buddy.

Disco lights, great music, friends and fun with Lola V. What more could you ask for in a class?

Class is $17 drop in, or for first timers, get our Just Try It 3 class pack for $24. Members may use their class passes for entry.

Go to the link for tickets, then choose the Group Exercise Basics option. Choose either the Drop in, or for first timers, go for the Group Exercise Basics Just Try it 3 class package.

When: Wednesday, May 20th from 6:30 pm- 7:30 pm
Where: Bruce Monroe Park, at the corner of Irving Street NW and Georgia Avenue NW
Cost: $17 drop in, or 3 class pack for $24
Link to register: From the Core Studios Online

Improvements in Progress at Bruce Monroe Park

July 25, 2014
One of the two new water fountains at the Bruce Monroe Park.

One of the two new water fountains at the Bruce Monroe Park.

The long awaited improvements to the Bruce Monroe Park originally announcement in April 2013 are finally underway. $200,000 was programmed to improve the park in 2013 by including two new water fountains and a shade structure — including seating, large enough to accommodate gatherings and programming.

It has taken a lot of effort and advocacy, but the improvements are finally underway with the goal of being completed by July 30th. To date, the two (2) water fountains have been installed, the shade structure is almost complete and eight (8) of the benches will be installed on July 25th (today) if all goes well.

The photo below shows the shade structure nearing completion.

Bruce Monroe shade structure(New shade structure at Bruce Monroe Park)

The plan below shows the location of the shade structure, the two water fountains, and the proposed location of the benches.

Bruce Monroe Improvement map

Little Free Library at Bruce-Monroe Community Garden

June 25, 2014

Little free libraryI posted earlier that a little free library was to be installed at the Bruce-Monroe Community Garden back on May 17th. This past weekend was the first time I’d had a chance to check it out and it looks as good as I thought it would (see accompanying photos).

According to an earlier commenter, the Bruce-Monroe Community Garden will store excess books in their shed, and replenish the library if it gets too low. If the library is full and you would like to make a book donation please contact the Garden at brucemonroegarden (at) gmail (dot) com

Little Free Library

Little Free Library Coming to Bruce-Monroe Park

May 7, 2014

On Saturday, May 17th, a Little Free Library will be installed and dedicated at the community garden within Bruce-Monroe Park (Georgia between Irving and Columbia Rd.). Below is more information about the library box that was shared on the 700blkHobart-Columbia-Harvard Yahoo Group listserv, along with a photo of the Little Free Library that will be installed on the 17th.

students+and+library(The Little Free Library and the students who designed it.)

Bruce Monroe Community Garden Little Free Library Grand Opening Celebration!

Where: Bruce Monroe Community Garden (inside Bruce Monroe Park at 3000 Georgia Ave NW)
When: Saturday May 17, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.
What: All kinds of fun …

  • Students and gardeners will install and dedicate our Little Free Library.
  • Teens will read books aloud to younger kids.
  • You can start borrowing books!
  • We also have a garden work day from 10 a.m. – noon and there will be kids activities planned for the garden like painting raised beds, planting, and a scavenger hunt. Come out for all or some of the time!

Books, books, books! Please consider bringing one book to donate if you’d like to help us keep the library stocked. We’d especially love to have childrens and young adult books or gardening books, but we would welcome any fiction or non-fiction.

The Details…

Bruce Monroe Community Garden, along with four other community gardens in DC, are the lucky recipients of a Little Free Library built by students as part of the National Building Museum’s Design Apprenticeship Program.

In their most basic form a Little Free Library consists of a box full of books where anyone can stop by to borrow a book or return another book to share. The libraries are usually creatively decorated to reflect the character of a host neighborhood, family, or in this case–garden. Design teams used salvaged and upcycled materials from Community Forklift to create the libraries.

The Little Free Libraries encourage local residents to connect with each other through a “take a book, leave a book” system at the gardens, and they help foster literacy in their communities. The books are free to borrow! Please visit the library, return books when you are done, and feel free to bring new books to the library to donate for others to enjoy.

Just What Would it Take to Get Park Morton Moving?

November 1, 2013
Empty units at Park Morton.

Empty units at Park Morton.

That Park Morton continues to remain in a comatose state is a source of frustration for many people I’ve spoken with.  The chief problem — based on what I’ve been able to piece together from those associated with the project — is land. There is not enough land from the original property to do everything the District expects from the Park Morton new community. Building The Avenue was a great help, but even it wasn’t enough.

While it was announced in March that a land deal had been consummated which united the Georgia Avenue frontage with the project behind it … that announcement was premature and the deal never materialized. Furthermore, though several of the buildings at Park Morton are currently empty, the commitment from the City to not lose a single unit of public housing in the redevelopment of Park Morton — and that that housing must remain in Ward 1 — means that it is unimportant whether Park Morton is full or empty. The number of housing units are dictating the scale of the project.

This has resulted in a bit of a scramble to find available property (in fact, any property) nearby that can be added to the project so that it can get back on track. However, there are two factors that seem to have not been seriously considered.

  1. Just because the current level of public housing at Park Morton needs to remain in Ward 1, there is nothing that means it has to abut the Park Morton property or even be located on Georgia Avenue; and,
  2. There is one large parcel of District owned land nearby that could actually solve this problem if it were part of a much larger master plan to enhance the entire community.

Permit me to think outside the box on  this one for a bit … and understand that all I’m doing is showing that there is a workable solution even if it might not be a solution that is adopted.

To the south is the large Bruce Monroe school site property. When Bruce Monroe was demolished, it was turned into a park rather than a parking lot based on community activism. It has always been intended to be a temporary park. A promised building to support the playground has never materialized. But, what if the property were divided with the Georgia Avenue frontage being developed for housing, retail, and a public facility supporting the park? The original Monroe School portion of the property could continue to be a permanent park. If this was done as a component of the Park Morton redevelopment, it would definitely be enough land to allow the project to move forward.

This detail from the 1968 Baist's Real Estate Atlas shows that the Georgia Avenue frontage of the Bruce Monroe Park site was originally private property with commercial buildings.

This detail from the 1968 Baist’s Real Estate Atlas shows that the Georgia Avenue frontage of the Bruce Monroe Park site was originally private property with commercial buildings.

Why would I propose having the Georgia Avenue frontage developed as such? … because it was originally private commercial property until the late 1960s when it was needed to build the Bruce Monroe School. By allowing it to revert to its original state we would increase housing, density, and vitality to that section of Georgia Avenue. We would also be able to justify making the section of the property that was originally the Monroe School a permanent park. And, because that park would be smaller, we could remove the unused parking lot that was built to support the park.

If this were an idea that was endorsed by the community, we could get the redevelopment of Park Morton moving now. But I also think the City would have to do one more thing to make this all work, and that would be to address the southeast corner of Park Road and Georgia Avenue.

It was hoped that the former used car lot at Park and Georgia — along with the other property between Morton and Park Road, would be incorporated into the Park Morton development. But, if land further away were pressed into service for that purpose, they wouldn’t be needed for housing (or at least not all of them).

If the Bruce Monroe Park became smaller to get Park Morton moving forward, it would make a lot of sense to me if the southeast corner of Park Road and Georgia were purchase by the District to create a civic plaza. Columbia Heights has a successful plaza and Petworth effectively has one at Georgia and Upshur. By creating one at Georgia and Park Road one creates a public gathering space in the heart of the Park View community. It would be a place where people could gather and possible use for a farmers market or flea market. This would also help create a more even distribution of public space in a neighborhood that has so very little of it to speak of.

The long and the short of it is this … the redevelopment of Park Morton needs to move forward and there are solutions if the City has the political will. While I’ve offered one solution, I’m sure there are others. But, allowing Park Morton to become increasingly vacant because the District doesn’t want to use the land it owns, or wants to embrace a solution that isn’t workable with the property it owns, is definitely not the answer.

The southeast corner of Georgia and Park Road is largely made up of an empty used car lot. The City could purchase the property to crease a civic plaza in the heart of Park View.

The southeast corner of Georgia and Park Road is largely made up of an empty used car lot. The City could purchase the property to create a civic plaza in the heart of Park View.

Bruce Monroe Community Day This Saturday, 2-7 p.m.

August 7, 2013

Bruce Monroe Community Day 2013

District to Invest $200,000 in Bruce-Monroe Park Improvements

April 26, 2013
Bruce Monroe Park will receive $200,000 for improvements in 2012.

Bruce Monroe Park will receive $200,000 for improvements in 2012.

Earlier today, Councilmember Graham informed the community that Bruce-Monroe Park will receive $200,000 to improve the park. In the letter officially informing Graham of the investment, DPR committed to completing improvements by December 2013. The improvements are to include two new water fountains and a shade structure, including seating, large enough to accommodate gatherings and programming.

Councilmember Graham’s announcement to area listservs is below:

Dear Friends: We have good news for the Park at Georgia Ave and Irving.  Mayor Gray has decided to direct $200,000 this year for needed in improvements at the park. I had made this one of my top funding priorities requested of the administration, but obviously it could not have happened without the Mayor’s enthusiastic support. Thanks also to the fine work of our Georgia Avenue stakeholders, including the Collective, the business association and Sylvia Robinson.

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