Archive for the ‘traffic’ category

14th and Irving Barnes Dance to Operate Soon

June 14, 2017

The Barnes Dance at 14th and Irving streets, NW, are scheduled to be in operation this month (perhaps has early as Thursday). Below is the flyer from DDOT explaining how it works. More information is available here.

New Crosswalks Signs Installed on New Hampshire at Otis Place, NW

May 25, 2017

Yesterday new signs were installed for the HAWK light at the intersection of New Hampshire Avenue and Otis Place, NW. Unlike a traditional stoplight, at this intersection pedestrians push the button to activate flashing lights, which in turn are intended to stop traffic so that the pedestrians can cross the street. However, cars frequently do not stop for the flashing lights.

As you can see from the photos, the new signs include a stop sign graphic, include the phrase “DC Law”, and have a separate sign below the flashing lights that states “Up to $250 fine”. This is a significant upgrade from the old signs installed in August 2010 which merely indicated that there was a crosswalk.

Time will tell if the new signs increase the number of vehicles that stop for pedestrians, but I’m happy to see DDOT is aware of the need to improve safety at this intersection.

Checking Out Pedestrian Safety in the Neighborhood

May 10, 2017

Yesterday, the Washington Post ran an article that included a map showing the worst D.C. intersections for pedestrians. I found it interesting, particularly when looking at the intersections in our area. A glance at the map quickly shows that the intersection of Georgia Avenue and Park Road is a location with a high incident rate. In fact, in looking at the entire map, two of the worst intersections for pedestrians are located in Ward 1. In addition to the intersection of Georgia and Park Rd (ranked #8) is the intersection of 14th and U Street (ranked #4)

(Click on map for citywide interactive version).

One thing that is really useful in the map is how each intersection with a dot shows the related statistical data. So going back to the Georgia and Park Rd example, you can click on the dot and see the injuries, crashes, fatalities, and overall danger index.

(Detail from pedestrian safety map showing statistics for intersection of Georgia and Park Rd, NW)

Pedestrian Scramble Coming to 14th and Irving Streets

February 17, 2017

scrambleYesterday, I received a notice by DDOT of their intent to install a pedestrian scramble at the intersection of 14th and Irving streets. This was one of the recommendations to come out of last year’s Crosstown Multimodal Study.

According to the notice (NOI 17-37 TOA), “the intersection of 14th and Irving streets, NW is controlled by a traffic signal. The Crosstown Multimodal Transportation Study conducted in 2016 recommended installation of an all-red phase to reduce the conflicts between pedestrian and vehicular traffic navigation through the intersection. Following the planning study recommendations, DDOT conducted further traffic analysis and subsequently completed the intersection design to implement the recommended all-red phase. The all-red phase, also known as “Pedestrian Scramble” will be implement along with diagonal crosswalks and “No Turn on Red” restriction. New traffic signals, curb ramps and signage will be installed at this intersection to complement the Pedestrian Scramble.”

Comments on this matter must be filed in writing to DDOT no later than 30 days after February 16th.

DDOT Releases New Mobility Website to Track Traffic Congestion

February 15, 2017

district-mobility

In exploring DDOT’s new District Mobility Website (full press release below), there is some interesting data on population (broken down by education, race, and income), the District’s transportation network, the modes of transportation that are used, and which routes are the most traveled and which bus routes & stops are the most used. It is an interesting site that provides a good overview of traffic in D.C.

Full DDOT News Release from February 13th below:

(Washington, DC) – The District Department of Transportation (DDOT) today announced the release of the District Mobility website as part of an effort to clearly communicate how the District’s transportation system is performing.

District Mobility is a dynamic web tool that shows the District’s state of mobility for surface transportation modes and outlines DDOT’s recommendations for managing and operating built infrastructure to meet growing demand.

“The goal of the District Mobility Project is to better quantify and qualify the state of the District’s transportation system performance from a holistic, multimodal perspective,” said DDOT Director Leif Dormsjo. “The interactive, data-rich design of District Mobility provides an innovative platform for sharing the state of mobility and DDOT’s progress towards reducing congestion on our roads.”

District Mobility is part of the ongoing District Mobility Project. The Project was established to increase understanding of mobility issues in the District and define a program of improvements to address them. It builds on national advances in transportation system performance management to track District-wide trends in congestion and travel-time reliability, among other key system performance metrics.

The District Mobility Project leverages transportation data for multiple modes (walking, bicycling, transit, and driving) to inform DDOT’s short- and long-term investment strategies. The metrics, data, and recommendations developed through the District Mobility Project are presented in both the District Mobility website and a District Mobility Report.

“The District has a diverse, multimodal transportation network that serves District residents, regional commuters, and tourists from around the world,” said Project Manager Stephanie Dock. “District Mobility is arranged into a series of stories describing the people who travel in DC, the transportation modes that they use to move around, and how they experience different aspects of congestion and mobility. Interactive maps allow website users to see how transportation demand in the District changes over the course of a day and how those changes impact all modes.”

By highlighting areas with high congestion, low reliability, and poor accessibility, District Mobility shows where DDOT will target near-term investments to improve multimodal mobility.

The District Mobility website and the District Mobility Report are both available at DistrictMobility.org. Feedback is welcome. Contact information is available on the website.

Could Bioretention Bulbouts Increase Safety and Parking at Park Place and Quebec?

February 8, 2017

Recently I began thinking about how to improve safe access to the small triangle park at Rock Creek Church Rd. and Park Place after a neighbor asked if it would be possible to close the street or add speed bumps to the small section of Park Place that directly abuts the neighborhood on the west of the park. After giving it much though, I think the best solution would be to add a few bioretention bulbouts to the area. However, it would require buy-in from the neighbors and a lot of sustained advocacy from the community. Below is a quick and dirty illustration that conveys the idea.

park-place-bump-outs(Areas outlined in green could be reconfigured as bioretention bulbouts, adding additional green infrastructure and calming traffic.)

The main problem with Park Place minor as it is configured today is that cars using this street take little heed for pedestrians and others as they travel from Rock Creek Church Road to Park Place major. The street is necessarily wide, and the crosswalk and stop sign at the southern end are set back, so as that anyone stopping at the stop sign is too far back from the road to see traffic on  Park Place major. Driver that do stop have to creep to the end of the street to see oncoming traffic — both cars and cyclists in the bike lanes — and this is if they stop at all. Frequently, drivers on this small stretch fail to stop at the stop sign and do a rolling stop as they turn to head south.

Closing the street doesn’t seem to be a good solution either, as the residents who live on the street would lose three parking spaces and it would make it necessarily difficult for delivery vehicles, moving vans, fire trucks, and ambulances to serve the these houses.

Strategic placement of bioretention bulbouts could narrow the entrance and exit of the street to a single lane. The benefit of this is that is would calm traffic and make the crosswalks shorter (and safer) to cross. A bulbout on the southern end of the triangle park would remove one parking space, increasing viability and safety for drivers and cyclists … and the bulbout on the southern end could be configured to add street parking by one to three spaces depending upon configuration.

The only significant down side I see is cost, so there would need to be both consensus among the neighbors most impacted and a sustained advocacy.

Perhaps the way to “sell” this to DDOT, DOEE,& the Council would be to bundle a number of these smaller projecting into a pilot program.

Snapshot of DDOT’s Crosstown Multimodal Study Recommendations

September 21, 2016

Last week I posted the highlights of the final Crosstown Multimodal Study Meeting, including some of the projects DDOT will be  recommending as part of that process. The full materials from the meeting have finally been posted online and are available for deeper review. However, I definitely wanted to highlight the Handout of the Recommended Projects, which indicates the broad range of projects, which mode they relate to, and how long it could take for implementation due to complexity. I’m also including them below for ease of access.

crosstown-recommendations-1

crosstown-recommendations-2


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