Archive for the ‘Demographics’ category

Documentary Exploring Changing U Street, Columbia Heights, & Petworth Screening This Weekend

October 5, 2015

DogParks & CoffeeShops: Diversity Seeking in Changing Neighborhoods (Trailer) from Sonya Grier on Vimeo.

Thanks to Borderstan for the heads up on this, the documentary DogParks & CoffeeShops: Diversity Seeking in Changing Neighborhoods is part of the Reel Independent Film Extravaganza at the Angelika Pop-up Theater at Union Market this coming weekend. The filmmakers will also hold a free screening and discussion of the film at the Northeast Neighborhood Library at 330 7th St. NE at 2:30 p.m. Oct. 10.

This film is based on research that explores diversity-seeking, community, and consumption in neighborhoods undergoing urban revitalization. In a study of three neighborhoods in Washington, DC, it finds that differences in resources, cultural norms and cultural preferences lead to tensions among some residents and perceived exclusion from consumption opportunities for others.

Borderstan has much more information on this film for those interested in learning more and planning on seeing the film.

Mapping Historic Segregation in Washington DC Resource Now Available

June 18, 2015

It is impossible to fully understand Washington’s neighborhoods without a good understanding of the housing segregation that once held sway here. It is a legacy that in many ways shaped the city, which in turn still has an impact today. This makes it all the more critical to understand this past.

Historians Sarah Shoenfeld and Mara Cherkasky have begun to document this history in maps. Their Mapping Segregation in Washington DC effort is a public history project documenting the historic segregation of DC’s housing, schools, playgrounds, and other public spaces. To date the project has focused on racially restrictive housing covenants. Racial covenants had a dramatic impact on the development of the nation’s capital decades before government-sanctioned redlining policies were implemented in cities across the country.

The interactive Website is now live, and free to explore here. Shoenfeld and Cherkasky’s work is far from finished, and only reflects information they’ve been able to gather so far.

Restricted Housing DC(Details showing Restrictive Covenants in the Park View area.)

Mapping Segregation in Washington DC, 1900-1950

March 4, 2015

Here’s a program that’s a collaboration among historians Mara Cherkasky and Sarah Shoenfeld of Prologue DC, historian/GIS specialist Brian Kraft of JMT Technology Group, and others. That sounds fascinating. It is funded in part by the Humanities Council of Washington, DC.

From an email:

Mapping Segregation in Washington DC, 1900-1950

Focusing on historic housing segregation in the Northwest DC neighborhoods of Bloomingdale, Columbia Heights, Mount Pleasant, Park View, and Pleasant Plains

Thursday, March 5, 6:30 pm – Great Hall, Martin Luther King Jr. Library, 901 G Street, NW

Sunday, March 8, 3 pm – Mount Pleasant Library, 16th and Lamont Streets, NW

Mapping Segregation in Washington DC is a public history project whose goal is to create a set of layered, online maps illustrating the historic segregation of DC’s housing, schools, recreational facilities, and other public venues. Our first year has been focused on racially restrictive housing covenants mostly east of Rock Creek Park, and the legal challenges to them.

Come learn why many of DC’s “historically black” neighborhoods were once exclusively white, and how more recent shifts in the city’s racial identity have been shaped by this history.

Come see for yourself the maps we’ve created to show restricted neighborhoods, the legal battle lines, and who lived where over the years. Maps tell stories that words cannot.

1952 Washington population map(Map showing demographic change in Washington based on 1930, 1940, and 1950 census data.)

Park View Among D.C.’s Transitioning Neighborhoods, Study Reports

June 18, 2013

Gentrifyine thumbnailBoth the Washington Business Journal and DCist reported yesterday that a draft report was filed with a city tax review board that identified 18 District neighborhoods as gentrifying, or transitioning. The method employed in the analysis used the following criteria:

  1. In 2001, if the neighborhood has a median property and federal adjusted gross income values below the respective citywide medians; and,
  2. And from this subset of neighborhoods, identify which of these grew faster (in median property and income values) than the relative income and home values in the city.

In reviewing the paper’s neighborhood map (click on thumbnail above), it is quickly evident that the report identified neighborhood “areas” rather than true neighborhoods, thus indicating that there are more than 18 Washington neighborhoods in transition. For instance, the Columbia Heights node includes Park View, Pleasant Plains, and Ward 4’s North Columbia Heights area. But regardless of the actual neighborhood boundaries or how many neighborhoods are impacted, the overall map does paint a picture of a significant portion of the city in transition.

According to the report, neighborhoods in transition tended to have younger populations, with the people moving into them tending to be more prosperous. Race did not appear to be a major factor in neighborhood gentrification overall, with some neighborhoods, such as Deanwood or Marshall Heights, being over 90% black both in 2000 and today.

The 18 neighborhoods identified in the paper are:

  • Anacostia
  • Barry Farms
  • Brentwood
  • Brookland
  • Chillum
  • Columbia Heights
  • Congress Heights
  • Deanwood
  • Eckington
  • Fort Dupont Park
  • H Street NE
  • Ledroit Park
  • Lily Ponds
  • Marshall Heights
  • Petworth
  • Randle Heights
  • 16th Street Heights
  • Trinidad

%d bloggers like this: