Archive for the ‘DPW’ category

Mayor Gray’s Plan to Replace Residential Trash Cans Meets DC Council Obstacle

December 16, 2013
Typical trash and recycling cans found in Ward 1.

Typical trash and recycling cans found in Ward 1.

Over the weekend, the Washington Post reported that Mayor Gray’s plan to replace the trash and recycling cans in 2014 is in trouble.  The problem, it seems, is that the D.C. Council objects to the money-shifting strategy Gray has proposed to pay for the program that would impact about 75,000 District households. To pay for this, Gray proposed to draw from funds previously budgeted for the District’s retiree health-care fund, and this is something that concerns council Chairman Phil Mendelson. The garbage-can plan transfer involves $9 million.

I certainly hope the council and mayor can find a solution for funding new trash cans. Currently, resident are required to pay a fee for replacement cans. The fee is $62.50 for a Supercan or $45 for a 32-gallon trash can or recycling can. Senior citizens, age 60 and older, are able to pay $30 for a Supercan, or $20 for the 32-gallon trash cans and $20 for the blue recycling cans that are used citywide.  For trash cans that can be repaired, the Department of Public Works will replace for free broken and/or missing wheels, tops and lift bars for 96-gallon Supercans.

While well maintained trash cans may not strike some as an important issue, in the fight to keep alleys clean and rodent free, they are essential. Improperly disposed of trash supplies food to rats and other wild animals which, in turn, contribute to greater health risks to the community.

First Weekend to Rake Leaves in Eastern Ward 1 for the 2013 Fall Season

November 15, 2013

The first round of leaf collection for residents of Ward 1 living east of 16th Street is from November 18th to November 30th. If you have leaves please have them raked and out by Sunday, November 17th for collection. Below is the map showing the area where leaf collection will begin on Monday.

Ward 1 2013 leaf collection map

DPW uses vacuum trucks to collect the bulk of the leaves, which are then composted. DPW urges residents to follow the schedule when planning to rake loose leaves into piles in the curbside treebox space for collection.

DPW will collect bagged leaves from the treebox space as well. In neighborhoods with alley trash/recycling collections, bagged leaves also may be placed where trash and recycling are collected. These leaves will be disposed with the trash as space allows in the truck.

Tips for a Smooth-Running Leaf Collection Season

  • Rake leaves into the treebox space the weekend before your street’s schedule collection week. Once DPW serves the area, they will not return until the next scheduled leaf collection week.
  • Please – leaves only! Tree limbs, bricks, dirt, rocks, etc., will damage the equipment and delay collections.
  • Do not put leaves in the street.

There will be a second round of leaf collection later in December. To participate in that, rake leaves out by Sunday December 15th for collection the week of December 16 to 28.

Reminder: Residential Street Sweeping Begins on Friday

February 27, 2013

From the listservs:

Residential Street Sweeping To Begin Mar. 1

The 2013 residential street sweeping season begins Friday, March 1, announced the DC Department of Public Works today.  Signs are posted that identify the days of the week and hours of the day when parking restrictions will be enforced so the sweepers can clean the streets effectivelyParking enforcement of residential sweeping violations will begin Monday, March 11, to give motorists a few days to get used to the parking restrictions.

“The residential street sweeping program is among our most successful operations to keep DC streets clean,” said DPW Director William O. Howland, Jr.  “We have expanded it over the years to accommodate more and more residents willing to move their cars to allow the sweepers access to the curb lane where debris and pollutants collect.  We also want to make sure commuters and visitors are aware that the parking restriction applies to all motorists and a $30 ticket can be issued for violating the restriction.”

Mr. Howland noted that beginning in 2012, DPW established March 1 through October 31 as residential street sweeping season and this information appears on the signs posted where the program is in effect.

He cautioned motorists to avoid parking along sweeping routes before that day’s restriction ends.  “A supervisor follows behind the sweeper and may require the block to be swept again, so no one should park until the end of the posted sweeping period,” he said.

Beginning March 11, parked cars also may be towed to allow the sweepers access to the curbside. Generally, parking is prohibited for two hours while sweeping is underway.

DPW street sweepers cover about 4,000 lane miles monthly, removing litter and pollutants by brushing them onto a conveyor system, which transports the material into a debris hopper. The sweeper also emits a fine spray of water to help control dust.  In addition to sweeping residential streets during spring, summer and fall, DPW also sweeps commercial streets overnight year-round, and parking restrictions also apply.

For more information about street sweeping, go to http://1.usa.gov/DPWstreetalley.

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Fall Leaf Collection Schedule Published

November 2, 2012

The 2012-2013 leaf collection schedule has been published and mailed out. If you didn’t get one, the map at the right shows the schedule for Ward 1. The full brochure is available here.

Leaf collection begins on November 5th for Ward 1 residents who live west of 16th Street. Leaf collection for residents in Columbia Heights and Park View doesn’t begin until November 19th.

DPW requests that residents rake their leaves into the treebox space the weekend before leaf collection. DPW requests that residents not rake leaves into the street.

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Where are Our Illegal Dumping Areas?

March 26, 2012

The alley area behind the Fisherman of Men Church has been a long-term trouble spot for illegal dumping

Here’s are two questions I’d like to throw out to the community.

  1. Where are our illegal dumping areas?, and,
  2. What can we do to get ahead of this problem?

My guess is that the first thing we need to do is have a comprehensive list of known trouble areas. As an example, I noticed yesterday that yet again two mattresses and a chair had been dumped in the alley behind the Fisherman of Men Church (former York Theater) located at Georgia and Quebec. This is a problem spot that has been going on for years.

I know there must be other hot spots in the area. Perhaps by identifying them and consistently reporting them we can eventually get ahead of this problem. At the least, we should be able to get organized enough to get the illegal trash removed in a timely manner.

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