Archive for the ‘Art’ category

New Mural Coming to Senior Wellness Center

September 14, 2017

A new mural is in the planning stages for the Ward 1 Bernice Elizabeth Fontenau Senior Wellness Center on Georgia Avenue. It is in response to Ward 1 seniors who wanted a mural on their building, and made possible by a Public Art Building Communities Grant from the DC Commission of the Arts and Humanities. I’m delighted that the chosen artist is Jay Coleman — a talented artist who is helping to make the District of Columbia a more beautiful and inclusive city through the arts. Among the other projects he is involved in is the Howard Theater Walk of Fame.

Below is a rough sketch of his proposal for the Senior Wellness Center. The design may yet change as he continues the process of working with the seniors.

(Preliminary design of mural for the Ward 1 senior wellness center by artist Jay Coleman.0

SATURDAY – Open Studio for Anthony Dihle/Victory Dance Creative 2 Year Anniversary

July 28, 2017

You may recognize Anthony Dihle’s artwork from his neighborhood posters hanging in Walls of Books or in local farmers markets (40 different neighborhoods and counting!). Or remember his work for the Georgia Ave Winter Fest and Fall Fest posters. Now’s your chance to see where the magic happens at his 2 year anniversary celebration this Saturday evening:

DC Poster Project: Exhibit and Open Studio
This Saturday, July 29, 5-8 pm,
Edgewood Studios
703 Edgewood Street NE, #2, Washington, DC 20017
(Mess Hall Building—look for the door about 20 paces uphill from the Mess Hall sign)

The space is shared with two other fine young printmakers, Bethany Hansen and Chris Haughery. In addition, space of other artists who work out of the Edgewood Studios, one of the longest-running art studio spaces in DC.

There will be air conditioning and cold beer, soda, etc. About 8 minute walk from Rhode Island Ave Metro, and street parking should be plentiful.

Park View Fire Call Box Harps Get Spruced Up

May 15, 2017

(Top of fire call box harp at Warder and Otis)

Recently, the three remaining fire call box harps in the neighborhood were spruced up. Each of them was painted black with gold accents. I especially like how the neighborhood name was added to the top of each.

While there are only three of these in the neighborhood presently, there were at least twelve fire call stations in Park View at one time. Over the past decade, I know of two harps that were taken out by cars, and the call box harp at Princeton and Georgia was nearly lost in 2011 when DDOT removed it during street construction. I successfully advocated for the harp’s return specifically with the idea that it could be part of an art project along with the other harps.

The recent improvements to the call boxes really enhance the streetscape where they are located. Perhaps, eventually, we’ll be able to incorporate some small art or images where the call boxes were once located as well.

(The call box harp at Warder and Otis is one of three in the neighborhood that have recently been repainted.)

In Observance of National Poetry Month: A Poem About Park View

April 13, 2017

April is National Poetry Month, and with that in mind, here is a poem with a Park View perspective by Kim Roberts, one of our neighbors.

 

Poem by Kim Roberts
Quebec Place NW, Park View Neighborhood

“See the new Kennedy Homes. Remarkable values for the price. Eight rooms, finished in oak and mahogany. Overlooking prettiest part of Solder’s Home Park.” –Washington Post advertisement, 1917

A two-block strip of road ends with a view
between black iron bars of an expanse
of sculpted green we’re not invited to.

A hundred years exactly have elapsed
since these two-story houses with their porches
leapt in three dimensions from their plans:

solid brick, gas lighting, attic dormers,
ice box, indoor plumbing, a garage
special-built for autos, not for horses.

A streetcar ride away from downtown jobs
but at an open, healthy elevation:
a neighborhood built to defy the odds

of Federal clerks with backbone and ambition.
On summer nights they’d pour in through the gate
(before these houses became air-conditioned),

a blanket staking out each family’s place
on the cooler grasses of the Soldier’s Home
to eat their picnic dinners, stay up late,

then in safekeeping of the distant dome
of the Capitol in fading purple light,
they fell asleep in tousled knots, still clothed,

women in their crinolines and tights,
in corsets. One communal sleep: how brave!
Who would choose that now on summer nights?

The Park Road Gate, in 1955,
was closed off. At some later unknown year,
they topped the iron fences with barbed wire.

Reprinted from The Scientific Method by Kim Roberts (WordTech Editions, 2017), with permission from the author.

Kim Roberts is a long-time resident of the Park View neighborhood, from 1990 to 1997, then again from 2002 to the present. The Scientific Method is her fifth book of poems.

New Mural in the Works for 3124 Georgia Avenue

March 20, 2017

A new mural is being planned for this vacant wall at 3124 Georgia Avenue, NW.

A new mural is in the planning stages for the large vacant wall on the southwest corner of Georgia Avenue and Kenyon Street. Advisory Neighborhood Commission 1A approved a letter in support of the mural at their March 8, 2017, meeting.

Prior to the approval, Commissioner Rashida Brown had meet with the property’s owner and with Words, Beats & Life with is the organization that has selected the site for the mural. Words, Beats & Life will work closely with the ANC and the community during the mural process. The organization partners with local artists and community members to replace graffiti with art and will provide the supplies and instruction necessary to complete the project.

No design has been shared for this specific site to date.

Checking Out the Respect the District Installation at 14th & Irving

February 13, 2017

Over the weekend I saw the following installation at the southwest corner of 14th and Irving streets, NW, which I guess has been there since January 10th. In checking out @RespecttheDistrict‘s Twitter profile, it states the following — The Respect Flag at 14th & Irving in DC. Designed by emzki. Connect your stories & selfies taken through the stars. Respect!

This art installation  is connected to Vision Zero DC, and is their 2nd public art installation aimed at preventing Street Harassment.

respect-the-district

Interactive Art Installation Explores Human Behavior on City Streets

January 24, 2017

The Walkway(The Walkway, and interactive art installation at the Reeves Center)

There is currently a public art exhibit on the corner of 14th and U streets in front of the Reeves Center. It is titled The Walkway and it is an interactive installation that is an exploration of human behavior towards others on city streets and in public spaces. The art space consists of a tunnel with each side showing faces and statements of interactions that have been experienced in public. Some of the experiences shared are positive — others are negative, harassing, or hostile.

What I like about the experience is that it makes one reflect upon their own experiences and interactions in public spaces. There is also an online component which allows anyone to participate in the project, which is a collaboration between the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities and the District Department of Transportation. Through the portal, they are collecting information regarding words, phrases and gestures that are used in public spaces to address others. This is a study to explore what people consider to be respectful, friendly, non-friendly or threatening interactions. While data collected will be used as part of an interactive exhibit, responses will be kept anonymous.

Below are a few more photos from my visit:

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