Archive for October 2018

Georgia Avenue Development Beginning to Move Forward

October 30, 2018

Nearly four years in the making, the development approved for 3619 Georgia Avenue has finally progressed to the point where we’ll start to see  a building rise above grade. Below is a photo of the current state of construction.

(Construction at 3619 Georgia, the week of October 29th, 2018.)

… and below is what the finished building has been designed to appear.

(Rendering of 3619 Georgia as it will appear upon completion.)

Fish in the Hood has Reopened!

October 29, 2018

(Fish in the Hood, a long-time beloved restaurant, is back open for business. Located at Georgia Avenue and Otis Place, NW)

Fish in the Hood reopened quietly on Wednesday, October 24th, and I’m happy to report the community response was immediate. They plan to be open on Monday through Saturday from 11:30 am to 9:00 pm (perhaps a bit later on Friday evenings). As before, Fish in the Hood will not have regular Sunday business hours.

Fish in the Hood closed due to a fire that occurred on April 14, 2017. Owner Bill White has been working to repair the damage and reopen since day one.

So check out this great local business and welcome them back to the neighborhood!

(Fish in the Hood’s counters are stocked and ready for customers.)

Police Redistricting Schedule for January 2019, Will Unite Park View

October 24, 2018

According to a Tweet by Kevin Donahue, Deputy Mayor for Public Safety and Justice, Police Chief Peter Newsham discussed the planned police district boundary changes that will go in effect in January with Mayor Bowser and the Council of the District of Columbia at their breakfast on Tuesday, October 24th. In looking at the images Donahue shares, for Park View the area bordered by Columbia Road, Sherman Avenue, Park Place, and Park Road would move from the Third District to the Fourth District. See below.

Another big change is that Mount Pleasant would be moved from the Fourth District to the Third District.

You can see all the maps shared by Donahue at his Tweet below:

 

 

Annual DCCX Cyclocross is at Soldiers’ Home this Weekend

October 17, 2018

For those who love great fall weather, cyclocross, and an opportunity to spend a day at the Soldiers’ Home, this weekend you are in luck. The annual DCCX races are scheduled for this Saturday and Sunday, October 20 and 21. The full schedule of events can be found at https://dcmtb.org/dccx2018/

Visitors can access the race area via the Randolph Street Gate located on Rock Creek Church Rd., NW. I’ve found walking in easiest, but there is a parking area for those who want to drive in.

 

 

Fish in the Hood Close to Re-Opening, Still Needs Your Support.

October 9, 2018

I know that many neighbors in the greater Park View area have been watching Bill White make repairs to Fish in the Hood and wondering when this beloved restaurant will reopen for business. It has been a long road since an April 14, 2017, fire shuttered Fish in the Hood, but now based on a reports on Petworth News and NBC4, most of the repairs have been made. The only major hurdle left if funding to make the necessary final tweaks and to stock the restaurant with delicious fish.

To that Bill has been selling personal items to generate funds and also has a GoFunMe Campaign running to help achieve the goal of raising the $16,000 dollars needed to reopen his doors.

Fish in the Hood has been an excellent neighbor and business. Donating $20 or more to this campaign is a good investment in Fish in the Hood, and in Georgia Avenue. I’m positive that Bill can reach his goal and as of Tuesday, 10/9, he had less than $3,000 to go.

Neighbors can help Fish in the Hood reopen by making a small donation at GoFundMe.

Next Park View Cleanup This Saturday, October 6th!

October 4, 2018

Georgia Avenue Thrive will hold their next neighborhood cleanup this Saturday at 10 a.m. beginning at the corner of Georgia Avenue and Irving Street.

Volunteers will receive free stainless steel straws, thanks to District Bridges. They’ll also debut 10 new, top-notch trash pickers, thanks to a generous donation from DC Reynolds, a wonderful friend of the community.

See the flyer below for more details.

Sustained Advocacy Results in More Trees for Park View School Project

October 3, 2018

I’m happy to report that I’ve been able to get 10-13 new trees added to the landscaping plans for the Bruce-Monroe @ Park View School project. But it took a lot of doggedness and refusing to take no for an answer for nearly a month.

While one would think that the landscaping plans would have been discussed at a School Improvement Team (SIT) meeting, of which I’m a member, they really weren’t. Furthermore, it has been a few months since the last SIT has met. This is an area that I’m extremely interested in as the school grounds have long been on my list of places where we could potentially get large shade trees to help address the tree desert in the middle of the neighborhood.

Site plan of the school showing location of new bioretention areas to be added at Bruce-Monroe @ Park View.

I was surprised when I inspected the school grounds in late August that bioretention areas were being added to the grounds at the front of the building, prompting me to request a copy of the landscaping plans on August 30th. After four requests, a copy of the plan set was finally shared with me on September 6th. A quick review of the plans showed that no trees were being added in the front of the building.

Immediately upon seeing the lack of trees on the site, I contacted the construction team, and later the DCPS project team, and asked about adding trees to the landscaping plan. The initial feedback I received was that trees would interfere with the bioretention areas, and that the bioretention areas were required by the Department of Energy and the Environment (DOEE).

Refusing to give up, I also contacted DDOT’s Urban Forestry Administration and requested a site visit. I also had a long conversation with DOEE which informed me that green infrastructure elements are required, but that bioretention areas were one of four ways that a project could meet that requirement. Another way was to plant trees, and that in many ways DOEE has a preference for trees but leaves the selection of which way to go to the project team.

Armed with this knowledge, I shared with DCPS that trees were an option and that if push came to shove trees would be the better choice on Warder Street.

Following DDOT’s site visit to the school, and after nearly a month of dedicated oversight, I was finally informed on September 21st that both the Warder and Newton Place sides of the building could accommodate trees without disturbing the bioretention areas already planned. This will include three trees on Warder Street and one on Newton that will mature between 60′ and 70′, helping expand the tree canopy. See the illustrations below for approximate locations and suggested species.

The illustration below also helps provide an idea of what each of the recommended trees will look like when mature.


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